Posts Tagged ‘Monster’

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Troll: Minion Humanoid  from the Dungeons and Dragons Battle for Faerûn set.

W 19 Troll, Minion Humanoid

Ruling – Keyword Ability

Regenerate (reroll when knocked out)”

WizKids Keywords Page:

Regenerate: If this character would be KO’d, roll it. If you roll a character face, return it to the field on the rolled face (but not the Attack Zone). Otherwise, move the die to your Prep Area.”

Regenerate is considered to be a KO replacement effect. This means that if a character would be KO’d and you roll a character face, it is not KO’d and returns to the Field Zone on the face that was rolled, and all damage is cleared from that die. If the character fails to Regenerate because it rolled onto an energy face, the die is considered to be KO’d and placed in the Prep Area.

If an ability would require you to KO a character die as part of a cost, such as Fabricate or Enlistment, you may select a character die with Regenerate as part of the cost. The first ability must fully resolve before you can roll your character die with Regenerate.

For example: I want to KO my Troll that has Regenerate and another character die to purchase one of my Flash Golem dice using its Fabricate. Fabricate: Characters with Fabricate will have 2 numbers (X-Y).  If you KO X characters with total purchase cost Y or more, you can purchase the die with Fabricate X-Y for free.” I would select my two character dice for Fabricate and purchase my Flesh Golem (placing the Flesh Golem die in the Used Pile). Once I have completed the Fabricate ability, I can then resolve the Regenerate on my Troll die. If the Troll successfully Regenerates, it returns to the Field on the rolled level. If it does not, it continues to the Prep Area. A successful Regenerate does not affect the use of Fabricate.

If a character die with Regenerate is KO’d while blocking, it will not return to the Attack Zone if it successfully Regenerates. It is placed in the Field Zone and is no longer blocking. If the attacking character has Overcrush, it will still apply the difference in damage to the defending player. You compare the difference between the attacker’s attack value the blocker’s defense value before it Regenerates, not after.

If an effect is placed on a die, if that die successfully Regenerates, it would retain the affects of that effect. For example: I use a Global to give my Troll the Villain affiliation until the end of the turn. In the same turn, my Troll die would be KO’d, but it instead Regenerates. The Troll keeps the Villain affiliation. This is because the die was never KO’d.

Regenerate is not an optional ability. If one of your dice with Regenerate would be KO’d, you must roll it to see if it returns as a character or is placed in the Prep Area.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Troll is a Fist type character card.
~ It has the Monster affiliation and Evil alignment.
~ It has the Equip icon.
~ It has a Max Dice of four.
~ This card is a Common and is #19 of 138.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF)

There is not a ruling for this specific card, but you can find clarifications on Regenerate, here and here.

You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Opinion

I like the Regenerate ability, but I’m not a huge fan of this card. I chose this particular card because it only has Regenerate and no other abilities, and I wanted to focus this article on the Regenerate keyword. Tarrasque: Epic Aberration, Troll: Apprentice Humanoid, Black Adam: Teth Adam, Lady Deadpool: Deadpool Family Values, and Zombie: Greater Undead all have fun and useful abilities that either work with Regenerate or they benefit from having Regenerate.

If you want your character dice to stay in the Field, finding a way to give them Regenerate could be highly beneficial. It’s not a guarantee that the die will return to the Field, but you don’t lose anything if they don’t because they still go to the Prep Area if they fail to Regenerate. I don’t feel like Regenerate is used near as much as it could be. That could be due to the lack of competitive cards with the keyword, or maybe folks just haven’t realized that it’s worth playing with from time to time.

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Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Doppelganger: Lesser Monstrosity from the Dungeons and Dragons: Tomb of Annihilation set.

*Note*

There are contradictory and conflicting rulings on WORF in regards to how this character card is supposed to work. I’ve decided to put an article out showing how I believe the card should be ruled. Please, check with your TO before any event to see how they’re ruling it. This is not how a ruling should be handled for any competitive game. There should be a definitive and unquestionable ruling for any effect or card that causes confusion. WizKids and WORF are falling short in this area and have since the game began.

W Doppelganger, Lesser Monstrosity

Ruling – Ability

When fielded, you may select a target character die you control. If you do, your Doppelganger character dice become copies of that target character die. (The copy has all of the names, subtitles, affiliations, abilities, and stats of the original in place of its own.) They remain copies until another character die is selected or you no longer have any active Doppelganger character dice.

The first part of Doppelganger’s ability is a When Fielded ability. A When Fielded ability will trigger when the character’s die is fielded by either paying the fielding cost and moving it from your Reserve Pool to the Field Zone, or by using an ability that instructs you to ‘field’ the character die. Abilities that move, swap, or place dice will not trigger a When Fielded ability.

Doppelganger’s When Fielded ability is not a mandatory ability. It says that when you field a Doppelganger die, you ‘may’ select a target character die that you control. You are not required to activate this ability when it’s triggered.

The second part of Doppelganger’s ability is a While Active type of ability. It doesn’t say ‘While Doppelganger is active’ on the card, but the ability works the same way as a While Active ability. The ability states that all of your Doppelganger dice will remain copies of the target die as long as you have a Doppelganger active in the Field Zone, or until you select a different target. The only way to select another target character die is to field another Doppelganger die and select another of your character dice to be the target.

Doppelganger will copy and replace its own name, subtitle, affiliations, and stats with the corresponding text of the copied die’s card. Doppelganger character dice retain their original text and abilities as well as any additional text or abilities in the copied die’s text box on its card. If you copy a die that has text that’s being ignored, your copy would not have any text either. If the text of the original is ignored after Doppelganger copies it, the copies will retain the text.

If Doppelganger is fielded and copies the text of a character with a When Fielded ability, it will not trigger that same turn. This is because the Doppelganger is already in the field when it copies that character’s ability. Any Doppelganger dice fielded after the first one will be able to use the When Fielded ability.

When Doppelganger copies another die, it copies the fielding cost as well. You will not need to pay the new fielding cost for the first Doppelganger die, because the Doppelganger die is already in the field when it copies the stats. Any copied dice that you field after the first would reference the new fielding cost.

After Doppelganger has copied a die, you refer to it’s printed purchase cost and energy requirement to purchase more Doppelganger character dice.

Doppelganger will retain all three of its Mask energy faces. Copying a die does not change the energy faces of a die.

Note – Doppelganger from the Dungeons and Dragons set can not be on the same team as Doppelganger from the Maximum Carnage Team Pack. Even though these two characters are not remotely close to be being the same character (and in different IPs), their names on their cards are identical. Based on team building rules, you can not have two character cards with the same name on one team.

WORF Specifics

So, now that the easy part is out of the way, let’s take a look at some more specific questions and the way they were addressed on WORF (WizKids Official Rules Forum). I’ll then give my input on whether or not I agree and how they should be ruled if I disagree with them. All of these are taken from the rulings listed below in the Official Sources section of my article.

Stats Question from the Guide: If Doppelganger: Lesser Monstrosity is fielded on its own level 3 face, and targets a level 2 Wolverine: Formerly Weapon Ten character die, does it take the stats of a level 3 Wolverine? If so, the stats will change if I spin the Doppelganger up, or down?
WORF Answer: Your Doppelganger would use its own level to reference the level displayed on the card of the die it is copying. As your Doppelganger die spins up or down, it continues to reference back to the card of the die it is copying. If the die it is copying changes, all Doppelganger dice in your Field Zone immediately reference the die stats of the new die (including burst symbols).
Stats Question from Doppelganger Post: If I field a level 1 Doppelganger and copy a level 3 character die, then I field a level 3 Doppelganger, which level’s stats do my Doppelganger dice have (and what level are they considered)?
WORF Answer 2: The level 1 Doppelganger die would have the stats of a level 1 Gold Dragon, and the level 3 Doppelganger die would have the stats of a level 3 Gold Dragon. A Doppelganger die copying a Sidekick die would only have level 1 stats at all times, but could still spin up and down.
Morph Stats Question from the Guide: I have a Morph: Kevin Sidney character die in the field on a burst face. I field a White Tiger: Mystical Amulet character die on Level 3 (4A,5D) and sacrifice a sidekick so she becomes 5A, 6D with Overcrush. Which stats (and abilities) does Morph end up copying?
Morph text for reference: Whenever a non-Sidekick character die is fielded, Morph becomes a copy of that character die but retains this ability (until end of turn).
WORF Answer: Your Morph would have 4 A, 5 D, and White Tiger’s “when fielded” ability, but it would not have Overcrush.
WORF Blanket Answer from the Guide: When an ability copies a “character die” or “character card,” it copies the copied die’s stats, abilities, and everything else printed on the copied die’s card, such as title/name, subtitle, purchase cost, energy type, affiliation, alignment, equip ability, and Global Abilities. As to stats, this die references the card that is copying (so on level 1 it has level 1 stats of the die/card it is copying).
DDK: Okay, so this one has me a bit confused. “If the die it is copying changes, all Doppelganger dice in your Field Zone immediately reference the die stats of the new die (including burst symbols).” So does that mean it gets any bonuses that the copied die gets? Not sure what they mean by this, because it doesn’t make sense unless Doppelganger was only copying the die’s face and not the levels as they state it does. If it copies bonuses, then I’m not sure how Morph is any different from Doppelganger in regards to what they copy, so why wouldn’t Morph be a 5A/6D (assuming Morph is level three as well)? Inconsistent and unclear! Two of the questions and answers are in the exact same rules post! I don’t like that WizKids has said that there is a distinct difference in terminology between Character Die and Character Card and are now throwing that out the window for copying, yet contradicting their contradiction at the same time. So how would I rule this? I guess I’ll have to back the majority ruling on this, even though I strongly disagree with it. So based off their rulings, Doppelganger and Morph would copy the die’s card which includes dice levels. I disagree with copying bonuses applied to the die being copied and I would rule that any bonuses applied before or after copying will not be copied (because you’re copying the card, not the die and bonuses are applied to dice in most cases).

Swarm Question from the Guide: If I copy a character die with Swarm, do Doppelganger: Lesser Monstrosity dice drawn from my bag now have Swarm?
WORF Answer: Yes, but the dice in your bag would only trigger Doppelganger’s Swarm. So Kobold and Doppelganger could each trigger Swarm off of their own dice, but not off of each other’s. The rationale is that if each of these character dice had the same “While active,” ability, you would get 2 copies of it. Thus, for the sake of Swarm, they shouldn’t count one another.
Swarm Question from Doppelganger Post: If I have an active character with Swarm and I copy that die with a Doppelganger, do other Doppelganger dice Swarm?
WORF Answer: If Doppelganger copies a die with Swarm, even though it has the names, subtitles, affiliations, abilities, and stats of the original die in place of its own, it doesn’t work with Swarm, since it’s ultimately not a copy of that die.
DDK: Wait… what?! So this is a complete contradiction. How can one post say that it works and another post say that it doesn’t? Well, folks, this isn’t the first time this has happened and won’t be the last. At least the last ‘accident’ had years between the posts. This was literally a month apart and only five posts apart. Come on WORF! Get it together! I was listening to Double Burst as they discussed these rulings and I agree with them on most of what they said – especially this. This is ridiculous and unacceptable. “If Doppelganger copies a die… …it’s ultimately not a copy of that die.” Folks, that’s the first part and last part of the exact same sentence. There is no basis for the second ruling. It sounds like someone that doesn’t understand the game at all wrote that ruling. I mean, sorry if I hurt your feelings, WORF person (because I’m confident there’s only one person on it), but this is garbage. If a Doppelganger is copying a Kobold with Swarm, it has its own Swarm. They won’t Swarm off each other, but they Swarm off their own dice. It would work the same way as a Kobold and a Goblin. They don’t Swarm off each other, only their own dice. Doppelganger, which is basically Kobold(b) that copied Kobold(a), has the Swarm keyword. If I pull a Doppelganger die, which is now Kobold(b), I will get a Swarm trigger.  Doppelganger dice are copies in all zones/areas, not just the Field Zone (so long as you keep that one Doppelganger in the Field Zone). My official stance is that Doppelganger will Swarm off itself if it has the Keyword – and that’s how it’ll be ruled locally until WORF comes up with a REALLY good reason as to why I’m wrong.

Sidekick Question from Doppelganger Post: If I copy a sidekick die with Doppelganger, can I use Professor X Global to field another Doppelganger die from my used pile?
Global for Reference: Global: Pay mask. Once per turn, field target Sidekick die in your Used Pile.
WORF Answer: Doppelganger can copy a Sidekick die, but doesn’t work with Professor X Global (either, both flavors are great). Doppelganger is treated as if it’s a die with the name “Sidekick” and not a die that is a Sidekick Die for the rules of the game.
DDK: I fully agree with this ruling. Sidekick is not really a ‘name’, it’s a type of die. From page six of the Superman Wonder Woman Rulebook: Sidekick Dice are special dice that each player begins the game with. They can provide any of the energy types, or Wild energy. They’re called Sidekick Dice because of their character face (which displays fielding cost, attack, and defense values). When in the Field Zone as a character die, they can be targeted just like character dice. Unlike Character Dice, Sidekick Dice don’t count as Character Dice in other places. Ally is a keyword that says: Character dice with the Ally ability count as Sidekicks while in the Field Zone in addition to their other designations. They don’t count as Sidekick Dice while in the bag, Prep Area, Used Pile, or anywhere else. If Doppelganger is copying a Sidekick, it’s copying it in name only, not dice type. If Doppelganger is copying a Sidekick die, it’s doesn’t gain the Ally keyword. It would need to copy a die that’s already got the Ally keyword, and even then, it’s still not a Sidekick die unless it’s in the Field Zone. All of this reinforces this ruling and so I’m completely behind WORF on this one. It doesn’t even seem like the same person that wrote this ruling, wrote the first ruling from the Doppelganger post.

Die Name Question from Doppelganger Post: If I copy a dragon die with Doppelganger, can I use Ring of Winter to move another Doppelganger die from my Used Pile to the Field Zone?
WORF Answer: Assuming Doppelganger copies Gold Dragon, it would count as a Dragon for Ring of Winter, since it has the name.
DDK: This ruling is in line with how Doppelganger works. Doppelganger copies the name in place of its own name. So if it copied a Gold Dragon, then it would also be a Gold Dragon. If you look up the ruling about Dragons from a long, long time ago, then it supports the ruling for this as well.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Doppelganger is a Mask type character card.
~ It has the Monster affiliation and the Neutral Alignment.
~ It has a Max Dice of four.
~ This card is a Common and is #24 of 136.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF)

You can find the “A Guide On Copying”HERE.

You can find rulings specific to Doppelganger in the “A Guide On Copying” as well as: here.

You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Opinion

I already know that there is a lot of disagreement as to how this card is supposed to work and I know there are likely going to be lots of comments about how I’m wrong. But let me explain this – this is my interpretation and my opinion on how the card should work or what rulings are most accurate or should be followed. Your opinion may be different, and that’s fine. I rarely speak out against WizKids, unless they’re just blatantly wrong. There have been a few too many of those instances lately and we won’t go into all that here.

As for Doppelganger, I’m not a fan of the card anyway – even if it’s super clear and easy to understand. I’m not a fan of copying dice or copying cards. I think it’s a mechanic that muddles any game and causes too much confusion when not done properly. But if you’re going to use Doppelganger, he’s a versatile in that you can use him to copy anything you need that’s already on your team and in the Field. He’s a great way to get an additional Swarm dude or more of your win condition. Use him if you must, but always check with your TO in advance for their ruling. And TO’s – Don’t worry about getting this ruling ‘wrong’. You’re the TO and your ruling stands until you find out different from WORF.

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Need to find a card? Check out The Dice Coalition‘s Team Builder!

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Clix Fans!

 

Welcome to the next installment of my HeroClix Figure Spotlight series! For this month’s article, I chose one of the Bombshells, Batgirl (037) from Harley Quinn and the Gotham Girls!

Batgirl 037

Figure Information

Point Value: 75 points
Dial Depth: 6 Clicks
Keywords: Bombshells, Suicide Squad, Monster

Team Ability
None

Standard Powers/Abilities
They will be listed as Power: Click Number(s). This list does not include traited powers and abilities.

Movement
Charge: 1-2
Hypersonic Speed: 3-6

Attack
Blades/Claws/Fangs: 1-2
Precision Strike: 3-6

Defense
Impervious: 1-2
Super Senses: 4-6 (part of a special ability)

Damage
Exploit Weakness: 1-2
Perplex: 5-6

Improved Abilities, Traits, and Special Powers
Batgirl has two Traits.

Trait:
Bombshell
When Batgirl makes an attack targeting an opposing character, give her a Bombshell token. FREE: If she has two action tokens, remove two Bombshell tokens, then make a close attack.

Trait:
Bloody Belle of the Bog
Steal Energy, Stealth. Batgirl starts the game on click #3. When Batgirl uses Steal Energy, she may heal past her starting line.

Special Defense Power:
WWI Flying Ace: 3-6
Super Senses. When attacked by a character with [FLIGHT], modify Batgirl’s defense +3.

Opinion and Strategy

Batgirl is a fun and powerful Bombshell character. She’s always the first character I choose when putting together a 300 or 400 point Bombshell team. Zatanna is usually my second choice, and then I fill out the rest of the team around those two. Batgirl is not Indomitable, but I think she’d be a little too powerful if she was. You have to play her with caution until you get her past her starting line, because as great as Super Senses is, it doesn’t always roll! Once she reaches her second click after healing, she can charge in, and use Exploit Weakness to hit them for a whopping four damage! She also has Blades/Claws/Fangs, but with a printed damage of four, I don’t usually go with BCF unless they’ve used Outwit to get rid of her Exploit Weakness. When they try to hit her, they have to get around her Impervious on her top two clicks. She can be a very formidable opponent once she’s healed into click one or two.

I also like using her with a generic Monster team. One of my all time favorite builds for 400 points is:

(75) Batgirl
(100) Rat King #24 Rare TMNT2
(80) Death #16 Rare Undead
(125) Monsterex #22 Rare TMNT1
(5) Professor X ID for Professor X #37a Xavier’s School (75 point call in)
Total: 385

I know I’m playing 15 points under, but I like the team and it plays well for me in a casual setting. I also can’t find a 15 point Monster that I like. Rat King helps me beat on their own team while Batgirl is trying to heal up into her top two clicks. Monsterex makes for a terrific, versatile distraction. Death has helped me KO characters in the past with his Trait: Harbinger of Death. It’s handy when you’re one damage shy of KO’ing a dude. He’s also got traited Blades/Claws/Fangs with Giant Reach of 2.

When I play a 300 point Monster team, I like using this build:

(75) Batgirl
(100) Horta #35 Rare ST:TOS
(125) Monsterex #22 Rare TMNT1
Total: 300

I’m a sucker for a full point Horta and I love Monsterex’s versatility. This team really depends on map choice and if I win, I typically choose the Horta’s home turf – Underground Cavern (ST:TOS). This map gives my Horta an advantage and also helps Batgirl and Monsterex position themselves safely. With cavern walls as cover, this team can be lethal if you’re not paying attention and Batgirl is the deadliest!

What do you think of this figure?
Do you have a figure you would use in place of this one?
Is there a figure you would like me to Spotlight?
Leave me a comment here or on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty!

Thanks for reading and remember to like, follow, and sub for more HeroClix content!

     LLAPLive long, and Prob it!

Greetings Fellow Board Gamers!

Our next featured game for these two weeks (April 12 and 19) is a game from one of my favorite publishers. We played King of Tokyo from IELLO. We played both the original version and the 2016 version. This review features the images from the 2016 edition.

King of Tokyo on Board Game Geek – here.

* Note – This is not a ‘How to Play’ or tutorial type article. This is a review of the game components and brief review of game play.

1 Box Art

Play mutant monsters, gigantic robots and other monstrous creatures, rampaging the city and vying for position as the one and only King of Tokyo!

Combine your dice to gather energy, heal your monster or just slap the other monsters down! Spend your energy to trigger permanent or one-shot special powers: a second head, body armor, nova death ray…

Stop at nothing to become the King of Tokyo… but that’s when the real trouble begins for you!

This is a great family game for two to six players. The game plays well with two players as well as six players. The recommended age is 8+ but we’ve had players younger than eight play the game with little trouble. There is some reading involved with the text on the cards, but younger players that can’t read can still play as long as someone helps them with the cards.

The play time for the game is around 30 minutes. Some games are over in as few as ten minutes, and some games can last up to 45 minutes. It depends on the types of cards that come up and how the dice roll!

Rules

The rulebook is probably a little more complicated than it needs to be, but this is another Richard Garfield game, so I’m not surprised. Don’t be intimidated by the wall of text you come across. The game is much simpler than the rulebook makes it seem.

Components

The board is sturdy and holds up well over time. The colors are bright and the art is really cool looking. Tokyo Bay confuses some players, even though it has a 5-6 player label on it. That’s more of a player fault than a design fault, just wanted to mention it because it happens a lot. There are also a few other reminders reminders on the baord for victory points and the ‘no healing off of dice’ rule for being in Tokyo. This is handy to have there because I forget about the victory points ALL the time.

Board

The dice are much larger than a standard size D6. They are opaque black with neon green accents. Younger players or folks with small hands will likely have trouble rolling all of them at one time. Players can roll however many they are comfortable with at one time, just be sure you keep track of what’s being rolled and what’s already rolled. All six of the dice are identical, with six different sides: 1, 2, 3, Energy (bolt symbol), Smash or Punchy as we like to call it (the clawed hand symbol), and Heal (heart symbol). The opaque green dice with the black accents is for an upgrade card that gives the player an extra die to roll. We usually leave the green dice in the box until a player buys that upgrade card, because these dice are used for anything else.

Dice

Each monster figure is very different in type and theme. The figures are all made from sturdy cardboard, and there are plastic bases for each monster as well. As long as you are not super rough with the monsters, they shouldn’t take too much wear and tear from being put together and taken apart a lot. Each monster comes with a matching monster board. The  boards have two spinning trackers on them, one for tracking health and the other for tracking victory points. The trackers are two different colors and labeled differently for easy identification. The art on each monster board is really cool and matches the monster figure.

3 All Characters

The energy cubes are cute, and look like tiny translucent green plastic Jello cubes. These can be easily lost and I’m sure I’m missing some, but I haven’t counted them. Many players substitute these for after-market energy tokens.

Energy

The cards are standard size cards, and I highly recommend sleeving them. Mine have never been sleeved and they need it. The newer copies of the game have different card backs than previous version (and corresponding expansions) and the promo cards. It’s never been a serious issue before, but I would prefer my cards be sleeved. The cards feel thin and flimsy, but they’ve actually held up very well over hundreds of shuffles. The edges are looking a little grimy and that’s the biggest reason I want to sleeve them. The cards will not fit into their spot in the insert if you sleeve them, so you’ll need or want an after-market insert or a deck box. That seems to be a common issue with board games that have cards as components.

Cards

There are a few different cards that produce different tokens. The tokens are standard cardboard punch out tokens and you’re not likely going to see them in play in every game of King of Tokyo that you play. We don’t even pull them out of the box until someone buys the upgrade card that needs the tokens.

Tokens

Setup & Clean Up

Setup is super easy. Each player picks a monster and the matching board. You place the Tokyo board in the middle of the table and the energy cubes next to it. Shuffle the deck, placing it next to the board and then reveal the top three cards. Place those cards near the board so all players can see them. These are the current upgrades that players are able to buy with their energy. As soon as one is purchased, it’s replaced with the next card from the deck.

Clean up isn’t difficult and doesn’t take too long if the players help by putting their upgrade cards with the deck and energy cubes back in the pile. From there, it’s just putting stuff back in the box. The most difficult thing is putting the monster figures and monster boards back in the box so they fit right. We’ve found that they fit best with all the monster figures on the bottom and the monster boards on the top.

Game Play

Game play is not complicated at all. You need to remember certain things, which is harder to do if you’ve never played the game before. For instance, players often forget to gain a victory point when they go into Tokyo or they forget to gain two victory points if they start their turn in Tokyo. That’s probably the most forgotten thing in the game with my play group. The board has player reminders on it, which are definitely useful. Players also forget that they can reset the three available upgrade cards by paying two energy.

Each player begins their turn by rolling the six dice. They can reroll any dice they want in an effort to get different results. If they still don’t like what they have, they can reroll any of their dice again, but this is the last time. In total, players get three rolls to try and get the results they want.

After they finish rolling, players activate the dice in the order they choose. Each side does something different:

  • The Bolt gives a player one energy cube for each Bolt face showing.
  • The numbers give players victory points, but only if they have three of more of the same number.
  • The Heal allows players to regain one health for each Heart face showing.
  • The Smash (or Punchy) punches opposing monsters based on where the active player’s monster is located. Monsters inside Tokyo punch monsters outside of Tokyo and monsters outside of Tokyo punch monsters inside of Tokyo.

Players can use their energy on their turn to buy any upgrade cards that are face up on the table, so long as they have the amount of energy required. The card goes next to their monster board if it’s a KEEP card or it gets discarded if it’s a DISCARD card (after they activate the ability on it).

If a player was dealt damage from a Smash (Punchy) while inside Tokyo, they can yield Tokyo and the active player (the one that punched them) will take their place in Tokyo at the end of their turn.

The complexity of the game increases when you get more and more upgrades on monsters. Some upgrades can make interactions very complicated, but most players have no trouble figuring it out.

Conclusion

My copy of King of Tokyo is about two years old and has been played probably 100 times or more. It was played an average of six to ten times each weekend for weeks on end, so this copy has seen plenty of table time. One of my friends has been called the Queen of Tokyo, because she’s just so good at the game!

The simplicity of the game play combined the complexity that the upgrades can add and the randomness of the dice rolls, makes for a rocking good time with friends and family. King of Tokyo is my most played board game that I own and I even own a copy of Cards Against Humanity and Munchkin. I never get tired of playing King of Tokyo. The expansions add different cards and monsters that enhance play even more. I wouldn’t suggest playing with the expansions until you feel you’ve got the core game down. Power Up cards are a new feature all together that are in the Power Up expansion. They have a set of rules that applies only to them. The Halloween expansion adds some new upgrades called Costumes, and those have a set of rules all to themselves. The Halloween expansion also comes with Power Up cards for the two monsters in that expansion.

I have both versions of the game, but I like the revised edition more, because I love Space Penguin and Cyber Kitty. Those two characters replaced Kraken and Cyber Bunny, respectively. I haven’t seen Space Penguin and Cyber Kitty’s Power Up cards in the revised Power Up expansion, so I’m not sure how different they are from Kraken and Cyber Bunny’s Power Up cards.

If you like King of Tokyo, I would suggest checking out King of New York as well. I own a copy of it as well, but it’s only been played about five times. King of New York has more complex game play, which is fun, but it’s no King of Tokyo!

What the Players Said

Paul – I like the base game a lot, but I love the game when you add in the expansions.

Katie – I love playing this game. I could do without the expansions, but they’re still fun.

Michelle – The game plays best with three or more players, and is a lot of fun. It’s still fun with two players, but feels a little limited.

Buy or Bye?
Definitely a Buy!

My game collection would be seriously lacking without King of Tokyo. It’s a great game that’s easy to learn and easy to teach.

Have strategies or tips for this game? Leave them in a comment!
Have cool accessories or custom pieces? Show them off!
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Board out and game on!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Crush Card Virus: Basic Action Card  from the Yu-Gi-Oh! Starter set.

W Crush Card Virus, BAC

Ruling – Ability

Knock out one of your monsters in the field to knock out an opponent’s monster up to 1 level higher than yours.

Cards from the Yu-Gi-Oh! set use the term monster instead of character. Monster from Yu-Gi-Oh! and character are synonymous.

When you use this action die, you must be able to target an opponent’s character die that is the same level or one level higher than your character die that you KO. If you can’t target an opponent’s character die or there isn’t an opposing character die to KO, you can’t use this action die. You can’t use an action die for no effect.

When you KO one of your character dice to use this ability, it is considered to be part of the cost to using this action die. If you are not able to use the action die, you will not be able to KO one of your character dice. If you don’t have a character die to KO, you can’t use this action die.

When you use this action die, if the character die you KO has a When KO’d ability or a keyword that triggers when the character die is KO’d, those abilities will trigger. If you KO an opponent’s die that has a When KO’d ability or a keyword that triggers when the character die is KO’d, those abilities will trigger as well.

Sidekick dice are considered level one character dice. If you KO a Sidekick as part of the cost to play Crush Card Virus, you can target an opposing character die of level one or level two.

Special note about Regenerate – This is a KO replacement effect. If you attempt to use Crush Card Virus and choose one of your character dice with Regenerate and it regenerates successfully, you will not be able to choose an opposing character die to KO. This is because the additional cost of KO’ing a character die was not paid. The action die would be placed Out of Play and not back into your Reserve Pool, because you attempted to activate it and it ‘fizzled’ due to a replacement effect. There isn’t an official ruling for this.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Crush Card Virus is a Basic Action Card and does not have an energy type.
~ It does not have an affiliation.
~ It does not have a Max Dice number, instead it says Use: 3 which means you must use exactly three dice for this card.
~ This card is an Common and is #112 of 120.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF)

You can find a ruling about Crush Card Virus, here.

You can find the Cross-IP Compatibility Wording information, here.

You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Opinion

I remember back in the good old days, we would use this card on teams with big When KO’d abilities that we didn’t want to use Blue-Eyes White Dragon on. Bringing BEWD meant we were potentially helping our opponent with the discount Global. Sure, BEWD was way more convenient, but this card could easily tip the scales against players that didn’t bring BEWD but hoped their opponents did.

In the current card pool for Golden Age, I’m not sure if this card would still hold it’s shine against something like BEWD. It possibly could, especially if you’re also using Mister Miracle: Show Must Go On. While he’s active, he gives your action dice the Boomerang keyword, which is really handy at times! It would depend on what other action dice you were using. If you’re using lots of Gear or Continuous action dice, then Mister Miracle probably is not a good idea.

I think it still has some playablility on particular teams, but I believe they need to be specific builds. Also, BEWD Global is still great in Golden Age for its cost reduction and it tends to pull the attention away from these other, more gimmicky type cards. But don’t count Crush Card Virus out completely! If you want a card that can KO your dudes for a When KO’d ability, see if this one works for you.

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

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Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

I’m back! I hope that everyone had a wonderful holiday season and started the new year off in good spirits! Now, it’s back to work and back to my regularly scheduled Confusing Card of the Week articles. I want to start the year off with a monster that will hopefully keep the bad spirits away for the entire year!

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Basilisk: Greater Monstrosity from the Dungeons and Dragons Tomb of Annihilation set.

W Basilisk, Greater Monstrosity

Ruling – Deadly Ability

WizKids Keywords page:
Deadly: Character dice that are engaged with a character die that has Deadly are KO’d at the end of the turn (even if the character with Deadly has been KO’d or leaves the Field Zone).

Supplemental Definition:
Engaged: A character blocking or being blocked is engaged with the opposing character.”

Any character die that blocks or is blocked by a character die with the Deadly keyword, will be KO’d at the end of the turn, during the Clean Up Step. This applies to all character dice that are engaged with a Deadly character die.

If the blocked/blocking character die with Deadly is KO’d or removed, the character dice that were engaged with it are still KO’d at the end of turn.

For Example:
I have a single level one Basilisk die in my Field Zone. If I attack with that die and it’s blocked by three character dice, all three of those dice will be KO’d at the end of turn. Even if my Basilisk die is KO’d, all three of those blocking character dice are still KO’d at the end of turn.

Ruling – Ability

Basilisk has an additional ability on its card that says:
“When Basilisk attacks, target opposing character die must block this turn (if able).”

This ability triggers for each individual Basilisk die that attacks, but only when they attack. When a Basilisk die attacks, it will target one opposing character die and that die must block the Basilisk die.

If an ability would prevent a character die from being able to block, then it does not block the Basilisk. This falls under the general game rule of “can’t beats can”, which means any ability that prevents something from happening will overrule an ability that tries to force it to happen.

The Basilisk’s ability does not prevent the opponent from choosing additional blockers. The opponent can choose other blockers to block the Basilisk aside from the forced blocker, but all the blockers will be KO’d at the end of turn because of the Deadly keyword on the Basilisk’s card.

This ability is not optional. If there are legal targets to choose from, the Basilisk must choose a target.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Basilisk is a Bolt type character card.
~ It has the Monster affiliation and Evil alignment.
~ It has a max dice of four.
~ This card is an Uncommon and is #58 of 136.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF)
There isn’t a ruling for this specific card.

You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Opinion and Strategy

The Basilisk is a nasty dude. If you pull him in a draft or use him in a limited type event, he could be very problematic for your opponent. He can take out the biggest threat in your opponent’s field, thanks to the Deadly keyword. One downside to this guy is that your opponent will get the chance to reroll the guys you just KO’d on their next turn. When using the Basilisk to clear dice from the field, you want to be sure you’ll benefit from it without helping your opponent – if possible. Letting them reroll a Shriek or DWiz might not be a good idea, depending on what their targets were to begin with.

Basilisk is not expensive to buy, which makes him great for drafts. He’s also got decent defense overall, but that fielding cost is not the best for a character that’s likely going to need to be fielded a few different times in a game. I still think he’s a great draft pick, and possibly even decent for a limited format that uses only D&D sets. His fielding cost is what will likely keep him from seeing a lot of major meta play, but seeing him across from you is not out of the realm of possibility!

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Need to look up a card? Be sure to check out DM RetroBox! It’s the best searchable card database I’ve found for when I’m at the computer.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Yuan-Ti Pureblood: Epic Humanoid from the Dungeons and Dragons: Tomb of Annihilation set.

W Yuan-Ti Pureblood, Epic Humanoid

Ruling – Attune Ability

WizKids Keywords Page:

Attune: While a character you control with Attune is active, when you use an action die, that character deals 1 damage to target player or character die (no matter how many of that character’s dice are active).”

Attune is a While Active ability. A While Active ability is one that works regardless of how many of the character’s dice are in the Field Zone. While Active abilities are like a light – it’s either on, or it’s off.

while-active-light

Attune triggers when you use any kind of action die, whether it’s a basic action die or a non-basic action die. Using a Continuous type action die requires you to place the die in the Field Zone from the Reserve Pool. If you activate a Continuous die’s ability from the Field Zone, this is not considered using it. For example, activating a Captain Cold’s Cold Gun: Frozen “Firearm” after it’s in the Field Zone is not considered to be the same as using it. Using it would be placing the Cold Gun die into the Field Zone from the Reserve Pool.

While a character die with Attune is active, when you use an action die, the character die with Attune will deal one damage to a target character die or player. For example, if you have three Yuan-ti Pureblood dice in the Field Zone when you use an action die, your Yuan-ti Pureblood will deal only one damage total (not three damage) to a target character die or player.

Attune abilities are mandatory and not optional. When you have an active character with Attune and you use an action die, you must deal one damage to target player or character die, even if you would be forced to target one of your character dice or yourself.

Ruling – Ability

“While Yuan-ti Pureblood is active, when you purchase an action die, trigger the Attune ability of all active character dice.”

Yuan-ti Pureblood’s ability is a While Active ability. While you have at least one Yuan-ti Pureblood die in the Field Zone, you will trigger her ability when you purchase an action die. Her ability triggers when you purchase any kind of action die, whether it’s a basic action die or a non-basic action die.

When you purchase an action die while you have an active Yuan-ti Pureblood character die, you will trigger each character die’s Attune ability. Attune abilities will only trigger once for each character, regardless of how many of that character’s dice are in the Field Zone, because Attune is a While Active ability.

For example, if you have three Yuan-ti Pureblood dice in the Field Zone, and purchase an action die, you will trigger the Attune ability of your Yuan-ti Pureblood. You will deal one damage (not three damage) to target player or character die. This is because all three dice are from the same character – your Yuan-ti Pureblood. Her Attune ability can only be triggered once, per instance, while there are any of her dice active in the Field Zone. If you were to purchase another action die, you would trigger her Attune ability a second time and deal one damage again.

This ability will also trigger the Attune ability on your opponent’s character dice. If your opponent has the same Yuan-ti Pureblood dice in the Field Zone, you still trigger her Attune ability as well as yours, because the two character cards are considered to be different characters. One is your Yuan-ti Pureblood, and the other is your opponent’s Yuan-ti Pureblood, making them different characters for game effects such as this ability.

If you trigger an opponent’s Attune ability, you do not get to choose the target of that ability because you are not in control of the ability. Triggering an ability is not the same as controlling or using the ability.

Yuan-ti Pureblood’s ability is mandatory. If you purchase an action die while she’s active, you must trigger the Attune abilities on all active character dice with Attune.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Yuan-ti Pureblood is a Bolt type character card.
~ She has the Monster affiliation and the Evil alignment.
~ She has a max dice of four.
~ This card is an Super Rare and is #132 of 136.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF)
You can find an official ruling for Yuan-ti Pureblood: Epic Humanoid, here.

You can find the cross IP compatibility wording, here.
You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Strategy and Opinion

Yuan-ti Pureblood is great for action centered teams, but if your opponent is using characters with Attune, her ability could become a nuisance for you. Her ability is still great and definitely worth trying out. She only cost two energy to purchase, but she can be blasted out of the Field Zone very easily. She’s got a defense of one on level one and level two, making her an easy target for Unstable Canister‘s Global. Her level three side is slightly safer with a defense of three, but she still falls victim to uncommon and rare Cold Guns.

I think she’ll be fun in casual play with the Satchel teams I’ve seen floating around, and she might even have a place in the major competitive meta, even though she could be troublesome against a similar team. I’m not sure I’d recommend using her as a main win condition in a draft, only because there are plenty of other characters out there with Attune and her ability could cost you in the end. But at the same time, because she’s so inexpensive, she could allow you to race your opponent to victory!

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Need to look up a card? Be sure to check out DM RetroBox! It’s the best searchable card database I’ve found for when I’m at the computer.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Bronze Dragon: Apprentice Dragon from the Dungeons and Dragons Faerûn Under Siege Starter set.

W 02 Bronze Dragon, Apprentice Dragon

Ruling – Anti-Breath Weapon Ability

“When a character die with Breath Weapon X attacks, you may pay X energy to prevent that damage.”

Breath Weapon:
“When a character die with Breath Weapon X attacks, you may pay X energy. Deal X damage to your opponent and all of their character dice. You may use multiple Breath Weapons in a turn, but only one per character (no matter how many copies of that die are attacking).”

This ability is a reactive type ability, meaning it can only be used if the triggering effect has been used. Anti-Breath Weapons will only work if a Breath Weapon has been activated by a player. You can use an Anti-Breath Weapon on your own Breath Weapon attack.

The energy used to pay for the Anti-Breath Weapon does not need to be a specific type. You can use any energy to activate this ability, unless a card effect would state otherwise.

You can use this ability as many times as you have the energy to pay for it. Unlike Breath Weapon, Anti-Breath Weapon does not state that it can’t be used more than once from a single character die.

When a character die with Breath Weapon attacks, you must be able to match the amount of energy to prevent that damage. For example, if my opponent attacks with a character die that has Breath Weapon 2 and activates it, I must be able to pay two energy to activate my Anti-Breath Weapon. If I only have one energy, I can’t activate my character die’s Anti-Breath Weapon against a Breath Weapon 2.

You can’t spend more than the amount spent on the Breath Weapon for Anti-Breath Weapon. For example, if I have two mask energy in my Reserve Pool and my opponent activates a Breath Weapon 1, I can only spend one of my mask energy for Anti-Breath Weapon. The only exception to this are dice that are not able to spin down to a single energy face, such as a basic action die’s generic energy face. You would use one of that energy for the Anti-Breath Weapon and the other energy would be lost because the die can’t spin down. However, you could use both of the energy for multiple Anti-Breath Weapon abilities if there are multiple Breath Weapon abilities activated. For example, I have a basic action die showing two generic energy in my Reserve Pool. My opponent attacks and activates two different Breath Weapon 1 abilities. I can spend the two generic energy to activate my Anti-Breath Weapon ability twice.

Ruling – Ability

Bronze Dragon has an additional ability that could affect the amount of energy you have to spend to activate Anti-Breath Weapon for your Bronze Dragon die. The ability is a burst ability, and it’s only found on the level three face of Bronze Dragon’s die.

Any level three Bronze Dragon die will allow you to pay one less energy to activate their Anti-Breath Weapon ability. For example, A Bronze Dragon with the burst showing, will allow you to spend one energy instead of two to activate their Anti-Breath Weapon 2.

If the Breath Weapon is a Breath Weapon 1 and you have a Bronze Dragon die on a burst face, you do not need to pay to activate that die’s Anti-Breath Weapon.

This ability is not optional and will automatically reduce the amount of the Anti-Breath Weapon.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Bronze Dragon is a Mask type character card.
~ It has the Monster affiliation.
~ It has a max dice of four.
~ This card is an Common and is #2 of 142.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF)
There isn’t a ruling for this specific card.

You can find the cross IP compatibility wording, here.
You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Strategy and Opinion

I don’t think Anti-Breath Weapon gets the love it deserves and that’s likely because Breath Weapon is not widely used. If there were meta teams that actively used Breath Weapon, we would see an increase in the use of Anti-Breath Weapon. Maybe the upcoming D&D set will feature some nastier Breath Weapon dudes, or more versatile Anti-Breath Weapon dudes.

Overall, the die stats for Bronze Dragon aren’t the terrible and the purchase cost is average for a character with beefy defense. This particular version is from the FUS Starter, but there is another version in the set. That cost one more, but in a D&D draft, he’s almost a must have. There are too many viable dragons with Breath Weapon in both sets to pass up the Bronze Dragon from the set.

If you’re playing a D&D only type format, I would highly recommend adding this card to your team, for all the reasons stated above.

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Need to look up a card? Be sure to check out DM RetroBox! It’s the best searchable card database I’ve found for when I’m at the computer.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

Wow! 100 Confusing Card of the Week articles! I’m proud of myself for making it this far and I can’t wait to reach article #200! John P. gave me a great idea for an article and I’m definitely going to work on it. He suggested that I do an article about all the cards with a collector number of 100 and rank them. Turns out, there are 14 cards with the collector number 100 and many of them are actually really good. Then there’s that one… But, what a great idea! So in honor of that idea, I chose a card from that list for this week’s CCW article. Be on the lookout for my Top 100’s article – coming soon!

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Oni: Greater Giant from the Dungeons and Dragons: Faerûn Under Siege set.

W Oni, Greater Giant

Ruling – Ability

Oni has a When Fielded ability. A When Fielded ability can only be used when the character’s die is placed into the field from the Reserve Pool by paying it’s fielding cost, or by an ability that specifically states that the die is ‘fielded’ and not moved, swapped, placed, etc.

Oni’s ability says that when his die is fielded, you may put a target Action die from your opponent’s Field Zone, Prep Area, or Reserve Pool in their Used Pile and cancel any effect that particular die may have had.

This ability targets Action dice and opponents.

This ability is optional, so if you forget to use the ability when you field an Oni die and you begin another game action, you cannot back up.

When you move the die to the Used Pile with Oni’s ability, any effect that the die had is cancelled. If your opponent were to activate a second copy of the same die, that effect is not cancelled. For example: You remove a Lantern Ring from your opponent’s Field Zone. They have a second Lantern Ring active. The effect of the second Lantern Ring die is not cancelled.

His affiliation is Monster – Evil. He is not considered to be a Villain. This is important for cards that reference Villains. Monsters and Villains are not interchangeable affiliations.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Oni is a Bolt type character card.
~ He has the Monster-Evil affiliation.
~ He has a max dice of four.
~ This card is a Uncommon and is #100 of 142.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Using Oni for an Action die in the Field Zone and one in the Prep Area on the same turn.

Game State
~ I have two level one Oni dice and two fist energy in my Reserve Pool.
~ My opponent has a Lantern Ring action die in the Field Zone and a Big Entrance action die in their Prep Area.
~ It’s during my main step.
(Main Step)
~ I spend one fist energy (moving it Out of Play) to pay the fielding cost for one of my Oni dice, moving it into the Field Zone.
~ I can now trigger Oni’s ability if I choose to do so. I choose to use his ability and I target my opponent’s Lantern Ring that’s in the Field Zone. The Lantern Ring die is moved to the Used Pile and any effect it would have had is cancelled.
~ I spend my last fist energy (moving it Out of Play) to pay the fielding cost for my second Oni die, moving it into the Field Zone.
~ I can now trigger Oni’s ability if I choose to do so. I choose to use his ability and I target my opponent’s Big Entrance that’s in my opponent’s Prep Area. The Big Entrance die is moved to the Used Pile and any current effects of that die are cancelled (which there aren’t any effects for Big Entrance while it’s my turn).
~ The rest of the turn proceeds as normal.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF)
WORF doesn’t have an official ruling on this card yet.

Basic Information

You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Opinion and Strategy

I’ve been an advocate for this card as an anti-action card for a long time. I think the only downside is his fielding cost, but with such a good ability, it’s worth it. You can use him to remove one of the most used Action dice in the game – Lantern Ring: Limited Only By Imagination. It goes away! It leaves the Field Zone and goes directly into the Used Pile. That means your opponent needs to work it back through their bag and roll it on an action face again. Do I think Oni is worth adding to teams? Absolutely – if you’re concerned about Action dice. If your local meta isn’t heavy on Action dice, don’t worry with him.

His purchase cost is good and his stats aren’t terrible overall, but that level three fielding cost can be painful if it hits you at the wrong time. But I do love his die – the light blue and the dark mauve/purple-ish color is a really pretty color combo.

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool and WizKids for the use of their sites.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

We played a limited event this past Saturday and this type of format is becoming a local favorite. Each player pays a $10.00 entry fee and they are allowed to choose ten boosters from any set that the store has in stock. Players can mix and match if they choose, but the best strategy is usually to choose ten from the same set. We had Battle for Faerûn, World’s Finest, Green Arrow and The Flash, and Deadpool in stock.

My Team

my-team-12-10-16

You can find my team here, on DM Retrobox.

I chose all ten packs from Deadpool. When I opened my packs, the cards I saw that stood out were several Deadpool affiliated characters, and one Lady Bullseye. I was definitely hoping for at least two of her dice, but I only pulled one, so I had to figure out something else. I volunteered to run the store that night so that the owner could spend some time with his family at a Christmas party. When you’re working and trying to build a team, you don’t always get the same amount of time as others to build. I threw a bunch of dudes together and hoped for the best! I picked all the Deadpool folks – without reading them, Free Chimichangas because it gives a defense boost and Deadly, Multiple Man because he has Swarm and I had two dice for him, and Lady Bullseye because – why not? Knowing my time was extremely limited on building, I grabbed Hulk Out and Resurrection for my two Basic Actions. I knew I couldn’t go wrong with a little ramp and Hulk Out to go with Lady Bullseye isn’t a bad idea.

Round One

round-1-12-10-16

My round one opponent had decided to build from the D&D stock. I loved having both Resurrection Globals to use, and that definitely helped me. I was not excited to see that Magic Helmet on my opponent’s team. It was a great counter piece to my Dogpool. I realized I had made a mistake when building my team by adding Outlaw. I only had one die for her, which made her a totally useless character. I could always use her for fodder, but her ability was bunk for me. I also made a huge mistake during this match. I was so focused on buying all of my Deadpool characters (except for Outlaw), that I neglected to buy any of my Hulk Out dice. This gave my opponent an opportunity to use his Big Entrance die and the three energy he rolled to buy all three of my Hulk Out dice at once. I didn’t think I was going to be able to pull off a victory in this match when he started fielding big characters, like his Minotaur, but some well placed blockers and well timed attacks left him practically defenseless. My characters were beefy on defense and heavy on attack stats, helping me find a path to victory. It was a glorious game of agonizing over when to attack and how to block. These are the games that make you feel good, regardless of who won and who lost.

Record after Round One: 1-0-0

Round Two

round-2-12-10-16

I found myself sitting across the table from Mr. DDK in round two. I always have the hardest time defeating him in any game, constructed or otherwise. I was fortunate though, that he missed my Resurrection Global for a turn or two because he didn’t notice it, which I feel slowed him down a little. He hit me pretty hard with a level three Angel Dust, but I blocked most of his other attackers. Letting Angel Dust through was a good choice because she went to the Used Pile and she had to cycle back through his bag. I only needed my Kidpool this game, because my opponent brought that glorious Anger Issues Global. Add a Hulk Out or two into that mix and it was game over for Mr. DDK. I considered myself very lucky that some of his dice didn’t roll for him and most of mine rolled on the side I needed or a side that I could use. He did some major damage though, so it wasn’t a cake walk. I did feel like I could lose the game on any turn if he rolled what he needed. That’s the nature of the game though. It was still a fun match with some back and forth and attacking/blocking strategy.

Record after Round Two: 2-0-0

Round Three

round-3-12-10-16

I apologize for the picture. I totally forgot to snap a picture before we packed up, but he was kind enough to unpack his stuff before he left so that I could at least get a pick of his cards. It was totally my fault that I didn’t get the picture I wanted and I have to thank my opponent again for doing this for me.

This game was incredible. I was fielding characters left and right, and he was constantly attacking me with his Purple Worm. It was pretty intense for several turns, because one misplaced blocker could have put either of us in jeopardy. I took a chance on one of my last turns and attacked when he had several characters. I knew he couldn’t clear my field completely so I’d have some blockers left if he rolled his characters back up. My two Deadly Deadpool dice were very useful this entire match, and even more on this particular attack. I was left with several character dice after the combat was done and my opponent was rolling all of those characters I KO’d on his turn. I was hoping only one or two would roll. He rolled his dice and none were characters. He rerolled the character dice, and luck was on my side – they all came up energy! I will not turn down a victory, but I do not like winning when my opponent has no options and can’t defend themselves – even if it’s because of a bad roll. But aside from how the game ended, the rest of the game was tons of fun. I’m very happy my opponent came to play and he ended up in third place for the event.

Record after Round Three: 3-0-0
Final Standing: 1st

Final Thoughts

We only used ten packs for our first sealed event a while back, and part of me thought that ten packs wasn’t enough. After playing this format a second time with only ten packs, I think ten is probably going to be the magic number. Some players will end up pulling great cards that have wonderful synergy together, and some won’t pull anything that works together at all. It’s not what you pull, but how you use it – with a bit of luck. I definitely had some luck on my side for this event. My team did not have anything that actually worked together for a super cool effect. Lady Deadpool and Kidpool were about all I had, and Lady Deadpool’s ability only made her cheaper to buy – nothing else after you had her. Kidpool worked with any of my Deadpool characters. You don’t have to have a team that functions like a constructed team in an event like this. Everyone is working with what they’ve pulled so everyone is kinda on the same page. Even pulling a Super Rare doesn’t guarantee you win – I had one rare (Dogpool) and I didn’t use his ability a single time. The rest of my team was common and uncommon, and I just threw everything together without really reading most of the cards. In my opinion, the Deadpool set is really good for limited events like sealed and drafts. Everyone is so used to drafting with sets that have cards with crazy good Globals or they play way too much constructed, that they don’t see how much fun this set is. I’m so glad I picked Deadpool to use in the sealed and I would totally do it again.

What are some changes you’d make without changing the spirit of the team?
Have a build you like better?
Leave me a comment here or on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Roll on, Dice Masters!