Posts Tagged ‘Rating’

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Shocking Grasp: Basic Action Card  from the Faerûn Under Siege Starter set.

W Shocking Grasp, BAC

Ruling Ability

Shocking Grasp is a Basic Action. If a card ability would affect an Action Die, Shocking Grasp could be chosen for the effect. One such example is Constantine: Antihero.

When you use Shocking Grasp, it deals one damage to a target character die. If the damage that Shocking Grasp does would KO that character, you can place the Shocking Grasp die in your Prep Area instead of Out of Play. If the character is not KO’d by the damage from Shocking Grasp, you must place the Shocking Grasp die Out of Play.

Shocking Grasp can target one of your opponent’s character dice or one of your own character dice. Players will sometimes target one of their own Sidekick dice or a character that has a When Fielded ability and KO that character with their own Shocking Grasp. This will enable them to reroll their character die next turn, as well as the Shocking Grasp die.

You can use other means to deal damage to a character with a defense larger than one, and then use the Shocking Grasp die to deal the final point of damage, allowing you to put Shocking Grasp into your Prep Area. Shocking Grasp must do the damage that KO’s the character in order for you to place the Shocking Grasp die in your Prep Area.

If you use Shocking Grasp and the damage KO’s a character, you are not required to put the Shocking Grasp die in your Prep Area. Putting the Shocking Grasp die in your Prep Area after KO’ing a character with it is optional because it says that you ‘may’ put this die in your Prep Area.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Shocking Grasp is a Basic Action Card with no energy type.
~ It does not have any affiliations, but it does have the Neutral type symbol.
~ It has a max dice of three.
~ This card is a Common and is #34 of 142.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Using Shocking Grasp during your Main Step.

~ I have a Shocking Grasp die in my Reserve Pool. My opponent has a Sidekick in the Field Zone.
~ (Main Step) I use my Shocking Grasp die to deal one damage to my opponent’s Sidekick. This KO’s the Sidekick, which allows me to place the Shocking Grasp die in my Prep Area instead of sending it Out of Play.

Example Two:
Using Shocking Grasp during your Attack Step.

~ I have a Shocking Grasp die in my Reserve Pool and a Sidekick in my Field Zone. My opponent has a Sidekick in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Sidekick as an attacker, moving it into the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assigns their Sidekick to block mine by moving their die into the Attack Zone and placing it in front of my Sidekick die (to show that it’s blocking that die).
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I use my Shocking Grasp die to deal one damage to my opponent’s Sidekick. This KO’s the Sidekick, which allows me to place the Shocking Grasp die in my Prep Area instead of sending it Out of Play. My opponent declines to use any Globals.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) My Sidekick was blocked by my opponent’s Sidekick. Even though I KO’d that Sidekick, my Sidekick will not deal any damage to my opponent.
~ (Clean Up) My Sidekick returns to the Field Zone because it was blocked and not KO’d. All dice Out of Play are moved into the Used Pile. All effects end unless otherwise stated.

Example Three:
Using Shocking Grasp on one of your own characters.

~ I have a Shocking Grasp die in my Reserve Pool and a Sidekick in the Field Zone.
~ (Main Step) I use my Shocking Grasp die to deal one damage to my Sidekick. This KO’s the Sidekick (sending it to the Prep Area), which allows me to place the Shocking Grasp die in my Prep Area instead of sending it Out of Play.

Example Four:
Using Shocking Grasp on a character with more than one defense.

~ I have a Shocking Grasp die and one Bolt energy in my Reserve Pool. I also have a level two Storm die in the Field Zone.
~ (Main Step) I spend one Bolt energy (moving it Out of Play) to use the Global on Magic Missile, dealing one damage to my Storm’s two defense. This means she can only take one more damage this turn before she’s KO’d.
~ (Main Step) I use my Shocking Grasp die to deal one damage to Storm. This KO’s Storm (sending her to the Prep Area), which allows me to place the Shocking Grasp die in my Prep Area instead of sending it Out of Play.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have a ruling for this specific card.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Ratings

You can find a guide to my ratings, here.
These are personal opinion of the card being showcased and not an official reflection of current major meta.

Golden Age Rating

Shocking Grasp definitely has its uses, but it’s a card that requires a specific team – especially in Golden Age. You could just throw this card on any team, but you likely aren’t going to get the full benefit unless the team has an actual use for it. A good character with a When Fielded ability and a low defense is a good reason to look at Shocking Grasp. It not only helps you churn your character, but it also gives you a bit a churn/ramp by letting you prep the action die if you KO its target. Sometimes it’s better to use an action die than bring a nasty Global. I can easily give this card a rogue rating for Golden Age. It’s a great card in the hands of the right pilot.

Shocking Grasp: Basic Action Card gets a rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Modern Age Rating

I haven’t seen a bunch of teams that would find this card as an easy plug-and-play in Modern Age. I think this is a very useful card for the same reasons that it’s useful in Golden Age. If Bat-Family finds a meta spot in Modern Age, I could see this card potentially finding its way onto a few variants of that team, but probably not with a majority of them. It can be a good way to KO a level one Alfred, but Unstable Canister provides clearer and more effective option. Someone that’s staying away from Globals would be more likely to use this card. Again – great card, but requires the right pilot, which is why it earns another rogue rating.

Shocking Grasp: Basic Action Card gets a rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Prime Rating

At the time of writing, this card was not legal for play in the Prime format.

Casual Play Rating

Shocking Grasp has text that’s very easy to understand for most beginners. I’ve seen several players asking about advanced tactics and strategy with this card so that’s one reason why I thought I would feature it. I’ve also noticed that the text on this card can be slightly confusing for those that do not speak and/or read English very well, which was another reason I chose to feature this card for this week’s article. However, the language barrier issue is not part of my consideration for my casual rating system. I wanted to put this article out there to help my friends in other countries to better understand this card. I know it’s easier for many of my friends to translate my articles than it is to translate card text. I’m here for all players across the world. I hope this article helps shed some light on this card for anyone out there that may be having trouble with it. I also hope it helps newer players with some uses for it that they may not have noticed before. I can easily recommend this card for players of all skill levels.

Shocking Grasp: Basic Action Card gets a rating of five out of five stars.
5 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

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Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Iron Spider: Waldoes  from the Iron Man and War Machine Starter set.

W 11 Iron Spider, Waldoes

Ruling – Suit Up Keyword

Suit Up is a new Keyword in the Iron Man and War Machine starter. Suit Up is an optional ability that allows you to field a die you just purchased by KO’ing another die. Suit Up only works for specific characters listed after the Suit Up keyword. For example, Iron Spider has Suit Up – Iron Spider or Spider-Man. When you purchase an Iron Spider die, you can KO an active Iron Spider die or a Spider-Man die to field the newly purchased die at level two. You can only KO character dice that you control for Suit Up.

A die that you field using Suit Up counts as being fielded for abilities that reference fielding.

The die you KO for a Suit Up ability counts as being KO’d for abilities that reference a character die being KO’d. Example: Vibranium Shield: Deflecting Bullets‘s ability would trigger when an Iron Spider or Spider-Man is KO’d for Iron Spider’s Suit Up.

The character die that is KO’d for the Suit Up ability must match the name. For example, you couldn’t KO an Iron Spidey die for Iron Spider’s Suit Up. Also, you wouldn’t be able to KO a Space Armor Iron Man for Suit Up – Iron Man.

* Note! *
You can use both Iron Spidey and Iron Spider on the same team. You cannot use Iron Spidey for Suit Up – Iron Spider. Iron Spidey is a different name from Iron Spider.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Iron Spider is a Fist Character.
~ He has the Stark Industries and Spider-Friends affiliations.
~ He has a max dice of four.
~ This card is a Common and is #11 of 34.

If you purchase the Iron Man and War Machine starter set, you will get all the cards, but not maximum dice for each character. You will need two starters for maximum character dice because those dice are not available in any other set.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Using Suit Up.

~ I have one level two Iron Spidey and one level one Iron Spider die in the Field Zone. At the beginning of my Main Step, I have a Sidekick, two Fist energy, and a Mask energy in my Reserve Pool.
~ (Main Step) I decide to field my Sidekick by moving it from the Reserve Pool to the Field Zone. The fielding cost is zero, so I do not need to pay energy to field the Sidekick.
~ (Main Step) I decide to purchase another Iron Spider die. I spend all three of my energy (moving it Out of Play). I decide to use Suit Up on Iron Spider. I KO my level one Iron Spider die that’s in the Field Zone and then field my newly purchased Iron Spider at level two.

Example Two:
Missing the Suit Up window.

~ I have one level two Iron Spidey and one level one Iron Spider die in the Field Zone. At the beginning of my Main Step, I have a Sidekick, two Fist energy, and a Mask energy in my Reserve Pool.
~ (Main Step) I decide to purchase another Iron Spider die. I spend all three of my energy (moving it Out of Play) and placing the Iron Spider die in my Used Pile.
~ (Main Step) I decide to field my Sidekick by moving it from the Reserve Pool to the Field Zone. The fielding cost is zero, so I do not need to pay energy to field the Sidekick. I realize that I forgot to use Suit Up on Iron Spider. I have to use Suit Up at the time I purchase the die, meaning the window to use Suit Up has passed. I am not allowed to use Suit Up and must continue with my turn.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have a ruling for this specific card.

You can find a relevant ruling regarding character names, here.

*EDIT*
New ruling from WORF today, here.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Ratings

You can find a guide to my ratings, here.
These are personal opinion of the card being showcased and not an official reflection of current major meta.

Golden Age Rating

While this ability is definitely unique and interesting, this is not a card I see being used in Golden Age. He’s a cheaper character with big attack stats, but his defense could get him blown up quickly and he doesn’t have any other benefit, like Fast. With Bard being the big dog in Golden Age, this card just doesn’t have its own place. It could be used on Bard teams, for that extra pow, but his fielding costs are a whole other issue. Bard teams like cheap to buy and cheap to field. He doesn’t quite fit the bill for Golden Age.

Iron Spider: Waldoes gets a rating of zero out of five stars.
0 Stars

Modern Age Rating

I don’t know if this card can find a place in Modern Age either. I think if someone is going to use Suit Up, it’s going to be on a different card, like Rescue or Space Armor Iron Man. He is a cheaper character, but we do have Unstable Canister in Modern. His highest defense is three – totally in the range to be blown up, which is very possible since Superwoman is a Modern Age card. There are still cheap cards in Modern Age with better stats and just as useful or better abilities that you could put in place of this particular card.

Iron Spider: Waldoes gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Prime Rating

As the pool of cards narrows, this card begins to look better, but still not completely awesome. Cheaper characters with decent abilities begin to get scarce when you approach Prime. One of the unfortunate things about this card for Prime is that there aren’t any decent Spider-Man characters to pair him with. We are limited to the three from Civil War and they aren’t the greatest with two of them being five costs and one being a four cost character. His stats aren’t any better than Iron Spider’s either. While I still don’t like him for Prime, he’s got the best chance in this format to make it on a competitive team.

Iron Spider: Waldoes gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Casual Play Rating

Suit Up has a well written description on most of the Suit Up cards. I don’t think it’s too confusing of an ability, but many players do ask about using characters like Iron Spidey for Suit Up – Iron Spider and Space Armor Iron Man for Suit Up – Iron Man. After explaining that the names on the cards must match the names on the ability, players usually don’t have any further issues with it. I really like this card for casual play. He’s cheap and has big attack stats. That’s something that appeals to many beginners, and he also has a cool ability that could easily be used as a teaching tool for strategy and tactics. I can easily recommend this card for players of all skill levels.

Iron Spider: Waldoes gets a rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!


For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Donatello: Intellectually Inclined  from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Heroes in a Half Shell box set.

I’ve now included an updated Rating System that covers all the competitive formats – Golden Age, Modern Age, and Prime. While Golden Age is not going to be a highly supported format in the official WizKids scenes, I imagine many areas will continue using it as their competitive format. Casual will remain different because casual players usually look at cards differently and I rate them on their ease of use more than playability.

w-07-donatello-intellectually-inclined

Ruling – Ability

Donatello has a When Attacks ability. These type of abilities trigger for each of those character’s dice that attack. Donatello’s ability has a cost associated with it. You must pay this cost at the time his dice are assigned to attack. You must also pay for each die that attacks that you want to use the ability on. You may only pay for each attacking die’s ability one time.

When Donatello attacks, you may pay a Bolt energy to deal two damage directly to your opponent or a target character die. This ability targets and can be redirected, reduced, or negated with other abilities or effects that affect damage.

Using this ability is optional. If you do not pay for the ability when the die is assigned to attack, you cannot go back to pay for it later. For example, if you attack and don’t pay the Bolt energy to use his ability and you move into the Assign Blockers portion of the Attack Step, you cannot pay the Bolt energy for his ability.

If Donatello is KO’d or removed from the Field Zone during the Action and Global portion of the Attack Step, it will not affect the damage that was done with his ability because it’s already resolved.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Donatello is a Bolt Character.
~ He has the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle affiliation.
~ He has a max dice of three.
~ This card is a Common and is #7 of 58.

If you purchase either of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Box Sets, you will have one copy of each card in the entire set, as well as the maximum number of dice for each card.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Attacking with one Donatello die.

~ I have one level one Donatello die and two Bolt energy in my Reserve Pool.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Donatello die to attack by moving it into the Attack Zone. I choose to use his ability by paying a Bolt energy (placing it Out of Play). I choose to target my opponent because they do not have any characters in the Field Zone. My opponent takes two damage.
~ The rest of the Attack Step continues as normal.

Example Two:
Attacking with multiple Donatello dice.

~ I have three level one Donatello die and three Bolt energy in my Reserve Pool.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I tell my opponent that I  am going to assign each of my Donatello dice to attack, but I do it one at a time so that I can resolve each of their abilities as they are assigned to attack.
– I assign the first die to attack, pay a Bolt energy (placing it Out of Play), and deal two damage to my opponent.
– I assign the second die to attack, pay a Bolt energy (placing it Out of Play), and deal two damage to my opponent.
– I assign the third die to attack, pay a Bolt energy (placing it Out of Play), and deal two damage to my opponent. The total amount of damage done to my opponent is six.
~ The rest of the Attack Step continues as normal.

Example Three:
Attacking with Donatello that gets KO’d after attacking.

~ I have one level three Donatello die and two Bolt energy in my Reserve Pool. My opponent has a Captain Cold’s Cold Gun: Frozen “Firearm” on a burst side in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Donatello die to attack by moving it into the Attack Zone. I choose to use his ability by paying a Bolt energy (placing it Out of Play). I choose to target my opponent because they do not have any characters in the Field Zone. My opponent takes two damage.
~  (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent doesn’t assign any blockers.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I do not use any Actions or Globals and pass priority to my opponent. My opponent decides to activate their Cold Gun die. They target my Donatello die, dealing him three damage and it blanks the text from the die until the end of turn.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) I assign Donatello’s five damage to my opponent.
~ The rest of the turn continues as normal.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have a ruling for this specific card.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Golden Age Rating

The only reason I think this card might have a use is because of Iceman: Too Cool for Words. You could use all three Donatello dice to attack with and with Iceman, almost always have the right energy for his abilities. But that’s only if someone didn’t want to use Cheetah: Cursed Archaeologist for some reason or another. I unfortunately don’t think Donnie is gonna see any kind of competitive Golden Age play.

Donatello: Intellectually Inclined gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Modern Age Rating

Without Cheetah in the format, Donnie should be the dude, right? I don’t think so. It pains me to say it, but I think a five cost character with a When Attacks ability that you have to pay for is too much even for Modern. While Modern is a slower format, there are still brighter stars in the sky.

Donatello: Intellectually Inclined gets a rating of one out of five stars.1 Star


Prime Rating

I think Prime is the place that Donnie has the best chance to make an appearance, as far as competitive scenes go. I still don’t think anyone is going to try to do too much with him though. His cost is still high for his ability, but he’s not completely bad. There could be a rogue team that surfaces with him on it, but I don’t think it’s likely.

Donatello: Intellectually Inclined gets a rating of two out of five stars.
2 Stars

Casual Play Rating

The major issue with Donnie is that some players aren’t sure about how many times they can pay to activate his ability. Once it’s explained that you can only pay for it once for each of his dice, it’s a little more easy to understand and use. I really like this card for casual play because it is very easy to explain to new players and not difficult to use. Donnie’s ability isn’t too shabby either for a beginner or casual player. I could easily recommend this card for any player of any skill level.

Donatello: Intellectually Inclined gets a rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!

Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

This is the corrected article. Thanks to Michaela for making me think about my original ruling and dig a little deeper!

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Howard Stark: Expert Businessman  from the Marvel Iron Man and War Machine Starter set.

w-02-howard-stark-expert-businessman

Ruling – Ally

Ally is a keyword that means the character will count as a Sidekick in addition to any other type that it currently has, but only while the character is active in the Field Zone. A character with the Ally keyword does not count as a Sidekick in the bag, Prep Area, Reserve Pool, etc.

A character with Ally will become a Sidekick the very moment that it enters the Field Zone. This is not an optional keyword and you cannot trigger it because it applies the instant the character is fielded. This matters specifically for abilities like the one on Punisher: War Journal.

Ruling – Ability

Howard Stark’s ability is definitely a interesting one. You can only use it at the beginning of your turn, before you start your Clear and Draw Step. You can sacrifice a Howard Stark die to give the characters your active characters that you control a +2A for the rest of the turn. You may sacrifice any number of Howard Stark dice and each will give a +2A, but you must do it before your Clear and Draw Step. This ability is optional to use. If you start your Clear and Draw Step and didn’t sacrifice a Howard Stark die first, you cannot back up because you missed the timing window for his ability.

When you sacrifice a character die, that die goes Out of Play until the Clean Up Step where it then goes to the Used Pile. When a die is Out of Play, game effects cannot affect those dice. Examples – Professor X: Recruiting Young Mutants Global cannot be used on Sidekicks Out of Play and Reclaim cannot be used to get a Howard Stark die into the Prep Area on the same turn it was sacrificed.

The buff that Howard Stark’s effect gives affects all characters you have active in the Field Zone at the time you sacrifice his die. Each of his dice that you sacrifice will give your active characters a +2A. If you sacrifice two Howard Stark dice, you characters that are in the Field Zone will get a +4A until the end of your turn. This type of ability is an applied bonus.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Howard Stark is a Mask Character.
~ He has the S.H.I.E.L.D. affiliation.
~ He has a max dice of four.
~ This card is a Common and is #2 of 34.

If you purchase the Iron Man and War Machine starter set, you will get all the cards, but not maximum dice for each character. You will need two starters for maximum character dice because those dice are not available in any other set.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Sacrificing more than one Howard Stark.

~ I have two level one Howard Stark dice and three Sidekick dice in the Field Zone.
~ I begin my turn by sacrificing one of my Howard Stark dice. This will give my three Sidekick dice a +2A until end of turn. I sacrifice my second Howard Stark die, giving my Sidekick dice an additional +2A for a total of +4A until end of turn.
~ (Clear and Draw Step) I clear any dice remaining in my Reserve Pool from the previous turn and draw four dice from my bag. Any character dice that I draw, roll, and field, will not get the +4A buff.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have a ruling for this specific card.

You can find an Ally ruling in the Punisher: War Journal ruling, and many other rulings, here.

You can find a ruling about Sacrifice, here.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

While I think this card is quite good, I don’t see anyone playing it unless Bard gets an errata or somehow makes the banned list (not likely). He costs one less than Bard, but you have to sacrifice him for his ability. Someone like me would try to use Stark in a major event, but I don’t see him making many team lists out there. There are better options for his type of ability – the big one being Bard. He does have the advantage of getting around Cold Guns though, so he’s not a card I’d forget about anytime soon just on the chance that we see a WizKids rotation that hits Bard.

Howard Stark: Expert Businessman gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Prime Play Rating

I think this card is great for Prime, but I don’t expect a lot of folks to play him if they aren’t using Overcrush. He’s got great fielding costs, especially since you may be sacrificing him! But if you’re using Reclaim, he could easily be churned many times over for some pretty devastating results. Just remember that you don’t want a Reclaim die the same turn you sacrifice him, because he’ll be Out of Play on the turn he’s sacrificed. I have the perfect place for this card on my Grodd team and I can’t wait to try him out.

Howard Stark: Expert Businessman gets a Prime rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Casual Play Rating

Howard Stark’s ability is absolutely confusing. I’m not sure why I thought it was a static type bonus, but he had all of us here confused. Thankfully, Michaela mentioned that it might be applied and not static, which got me to thinking and digging deeper. Glad she said something! So, Stark is lucky I don’t knock him down to a three for causing so much confusion. The needed knowledge for sacrifice can be obtained easily if the player is looking for it. Some new players may confuse sacrificing for KO’ing, but once they know the difference, it’s not usually an issue. Lots of players forget or don’t know that sacrificed characters go Out of Play instead of the directly to the Used Pile. It’s a common mistake among players of all skill levels. I can still easily recommend Howard Stark for players of all skill levels, even with his earlier confusion. He’s a great card, and he offers a great way to showcase the rarely used game mechanic, sacrifice.

Howard Stark: Expert Businessman gets a casual play rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Mistakes Were Made!

And this goes to show everyone – I absolutely do make mistakes. I’m definitely not perfect and for all my understanding of the game, this one card tripped me up today. I’m a one person operation here, but I will usually consult with Mr. DDK and a few of the other locals that are more competitive for their opinions, just to be sure I’ve got my interpretation right. Very rarely do we have this issue, but Howard Stark had all of us fooled today! But I’m still so glad I picked him for the Confusing Card of the Week. Never be afraid to question things you think may not be accurate. You could save someone a world of problems, like Michaela did for me today! And don’t be ashamed or embarrassed by a mistake. Admit the mistake, pick yourself up, and roll on!

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at the Turtle Van: Basic Action Card from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles box set. This is in celebration of the release of the new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Heroes in a Half-Shell box set that’s due out tomorrow!

w-turtle-van-bac

Ruling – Ability

Turtle Van is a Continuous Basic Action. If a card ability would affect an Action Die, Turtle Van could be chosen for the effect. One such example is Constantine: Antihero.

Continuous is a keyword found on Action cards. When you use the action die, it is placed in the Field Zone and will remain in the Field Zone until the ability is activated or triggered. Activating or triggering the ability is not considered ‘using’ the die. Using the die is when you move it from your Reserve Pool into the Field Zone. It can remain in the Field Zone after your turn.

Turtle Van’s ability says that you can send Turtle Van to your Used Pile and prevent all damage to a target blocking character. This ability targets a single character die when you activate it. You may target one of your character dice or one of your opponent’s character dice. When activated, the target blocking character die will take no damage from the character it’s blocking. It will also be protected from any Globals or abilities that would damage it after the activation of Turtle Van.

There is a specific timing window for when you can activate Turtle Van. You can only activate the ability on a Turtle Van die after blockers have been assigned, during the Actions and Globals portion of the Attack Step. If you’re the active player, you will have priority to use Actions and Globals. If you’re not the active player, you will have to wait until your opponent passes you priority before you can activate Turtle Van. That means your character can still take ability damage before you’re passed priority and able to activate Turtle Van.

When you activate Turtle Van, it will go directly to the Used Pile, as per the card text.

Turtle Van has a special interaction with Overcrush. Overcrush will only work if all of the attacking character die’s blockers have been KO’d or removed by an effect. If the blocker is still present, but the damage to the blocker is prevented by an ability like Turtle Van, Overcrush will not work.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Turtle Van is a Basic Action with no energy type.
~ It does not have an affiliation.
~ It has a max dice of three.
~ This card is a Common and is #58 of 58.

If you purchase the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turltes Box Set, you will have one copy of each card in the entire set, as well as the maximum number of dice for each card.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Using Turtle Van on your turn.

~ I have one Turtle Van die and a level three Gorilla Grodd: Force of Mind die in the Field Zone. My opponent has a Sidekick die in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Gorilla Grodd as an attacker, moving him into the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assigns their Sidekick to block my Grodd, moving it into the Attack Zone in front of my Grodd die.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I activate my Turtle Van, targeting my opponent’s Sidekick die and placing my Turtle Van into the Used Pile. The Sidekick will take no damage for the rest of the turn. I don’t activate/use any other Actions or Globals, and my opponent doesn’t use any Globals.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) My Grodd’s seven damage is assigned to the Sidekick, but the Sidekick will take no damage. The Sidekick assigns its one damage to Grodd, but it’s not enough to KO him.
~ (Clean Up Step) Both character dice are returned to the Field Zone. All effects end and all dice Out of Play are moved to the Used Pile.

Example Two:
Turtle Van interaction with Overcrush, on your opponent’s turn.

~ I have one Turtle Van die and two Sidekick dice in the Field Zone. My opponent has a level three Gorilla Grodd die in the Field Zone. My opponent has one Bolt energy in the Reserve Pool and has Magic Missile: Basic Action Card.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) My opponent assigns Gorilla Grodd as an attacker, moving him into the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) I assign both of my Sidekick dice to block Grodd, moving them into the Attack Zone in front of the Grodd die.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) My opponent has priority on Actions and Globals, so they use their Bolt energy (moving it Out of Play) to activate the Global on Magic Missile and target one of my blocking Sidekick dice. The Sidekick is KO’d and placed in my Prep Area. My opponent passes priority to me and I activate my Turtle Van, targeting my remaining blocking Sidekick and placing my Turtle Van die in the Used Pile.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Grodd’s seven damage is assigned to the Sidekick, but the Sidekick will take no damage. The Sidekick assigns its one damage to Grodd, but it’s not enough to KO him.
~ (Clean Up Step) Both character dice are returned to the Field Zone. All effects end and all dice Out of Play are moved to the Used Pile.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have a ruling for this specific card.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

Overcrush is not a huge deal in the current meta, but as soon as you don’t bring an answer for it, you’ll face off against a rogue Overcrush team. This action isn’t just good for stopping Overcrush, it’s also handy in preventing your opponent’s blocking character from taking damage and getting some crazy effect to go off or even save one of your own blockers from being KO’d. I could see someone adding this to a team if they’re worried about Overcrush and it’s not a terrible card. But since Overcrush isn’t a major meta thing, I can’t give Turtle Van more than a rogue rating. It’s useful for other things besides stopping Overcrush, but there are also tons of other really good BACs out there that someone may want to use instead.

Turtle Van: Basic Action Card gets a rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Prime Play Rating

Turtle Van has been a huge deal in our local Prime meta. Everyone has an Overcrush team of some kind and Turtle Van is a great tech against it. If other meta scenes even slightly resemble ours, then I could see this particular BAC making it onto lots of teams. It’s also great for stopping double damage that a character may be dealing with against Lady Bullseye’s ability. I really like this card and I’d be surprised if it didn’t make at least Prime rogue status, even with the new versions of Polymorph and Magic Missile coming out tomorrow in the new TMNT Box Set.

Turtle Van: Basic Action Card gets a Prime rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Casual Play Rating

I’ve seen this card in lots of casual matches. It’s not a super confusing ability, but the tricks of how to use it against Overcrush are not as apparent to new players. Learning to use the card in that way is something that comes with experience. The one major thing about this card that confuses players is the Continuous part. Even after some explanation, beginners and less experienced players still have a hard time understanding that action dice do not stay in your Reserve Pool – you can’t use action dice on your opponent’s turn. Newer players confuse using an action die with activating an action die’s ability. That’s really the only thing holding Turtle Van back from a five star casual rating. I still recommend this card to our newer players because it’s a great way to learn how to use action dice and how/when to activate Continuous action dice. Don’t discourage new players from Continuous actions just because they can be difficult to understand at first. If you’re a newer player reading this, I encourage you to add at least one Continuous action to your team and play with it. There are lots of great Continuous actions out there, including Turtle Van!

Turtle Van: Basic Action Card gets a casual play rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Batcave: Home Sweet Cave from the DC World’s Finest set.

w-batcave-home-sweet-cave

Ruling – Ability

Batcave is a Continuous, Non-Basic Action. If a card ability would affect an Action Die and does not specify Basic Action Die, Batcave could be chosen for the effect. One such example is Constantine: Antihero.

Continuous is a keyword found on Action cards. When you use the action die, it is placed in the Field Zone and will remain in the Field Zone until the ability is activated or triggered. Activating or triggering the ability is not considered ‘using’ the die. Using the die is when you move it from your Reserve Pool into the Field Zone. It can remain in the Field Zone after your turn.

Batcave’s ability says that when one of of your character dice is KO’d, you can place it under your Batcave die instead. This is optional, which means if you forget to place a KO’d character die under Batcave and realize it later in the turn, you can’t back up to place it under Batcave. If a character ability would put the character die somewhere other than your Prep Area, you may still place that die under Batcave. When KO’d abilities on character dice would still happen but if there is a timing conflict, the active player’s abilities would happen first. If the active player controls both abilities, that player chooses the order in which they happen.

During your Main Step, you can move your Batcave die to your Used Pile and take all of your character dice that were under it and return them to the Field Zone. Those dice return to the Field Zone at level one, and they are not considered to be fielded for When Fielded effects. You can only activate Batcave on your turn. You can have multiple Batcave dice active and you can choose which die to place your KO’d character under. You can also activate as many Batcave dice as you have during your Main Step.

If a card ability would remove your Batcave die (sending it Out of Play, to the Used Pile, etc), then your character dice that were under Batcave would go to your Used Pile.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Batcave: Home Sweet Cave is a Shield Action.
~ It does not have an affiliation.
~ It has a max dice of four.
~ This card is a Common and is #37 of 142.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Characters KO’d during the Main Step and the Attack Step.

~ I have two Sidekick dice and one level two Zatanna: Actual Magician die in the Field Zone. I also have a Batcave active in the Field Zone and three Wild energy in my Reserve Pool. My opponent has two Sidekick dice in the Field Zone.
~ (Main Step) I spend one Wild energy as a Bolt (moving it Out of Play) and KO my Zatanna die to use Blue-Eyes White Dragon‘s Global. I choose to put Zatanna in the Prep Area and not under Batcave.
~ (Main Step) I spend one Wild as a Mask (moving it Out of Play) to purchase another Zatanna die, placing it in the Used Pile. Blue-Eyes Global allowed me to purchase the die for two less.
~ (Main Step) I pass priority to my opponent and they don’t use any Globals.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my two Sidekick dice to attack, moving them into the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assigns each of their Sidekick dice to block mine, moving them into the Attack Zone and placing each one in front of mine.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Each Sidekick has one attack and one defense. All Sidekicks will deal one damage and KO each other. I choose to place both of my Sidekick dice under Batcave instead of the Prep Area.
~ (Clean Up Step) All character dice that were KO’d by damage from blocking or by being blocked are now sent to their respective Prep Area, unless otherwise stated. My two Sidekicks will go under my Batcave. All effects clear from active dice (unless otherwise stated). All dice that are Out of Play are moved to the Used Pile.

Example Two:
Activating Batcave.

~ I have a Batcave die in the Field Zone with three Sidekick dice and three Guy Gardner dice under it. It’s currently my Main Step.
~ (Main Step) I choose to activate Batcave. I move my Batcave die directly to the Used Pile, and then all the character dice that were under it are returned to the Field Zone at level one.
~ (Main Step) I now have three level one Guy Gardner dice and three Sidekick dice in my Field Zone.

Official Sources

You can find an official ruling here, on WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF).

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

I can’t think of a team that this would be good for in the current Unlimited meta. With Antihero being such a widely used piece in the meta, I can’t see this card being used much – if at all. The card isn’t bad but it’s not good to use something like Batcave when there is a counter for it being played on numerous teams.

Batcave: Home Sweet Cave gets a rating of zero out of five stars.
0 Stars

Prime Play Rating

From the matches I’ve played in the prime format, I could see someone being able to pull off some fun things with this card. I don’t see it making a top tier list, but I could see it squeaking into the rogue tier somewhere. We don’t have major threats like Antihero to worry about in prime, unless I missed them. If you find some, don’t be shy – leave your findings and ideas in the comments! But even in the slower prime format, I don’t know if this card has a place in the meta. I’m sure someone can find a creative way to build around this card and surprise us all.

Batcave: Home Sweet Cave gets a Prime rating of two out of five stars.
2 Stars

Casual Play Rating

I have played this card a bunch of times in a casual setting, and it’s actually really fun. A team with the Batcave and Guy Gardner is effective and fun to play. But the use of the card and die leaves many folks confused, especially when they don’t know what to do with characters when their Batcave gets removed by another effect. It left me stumped for a while too, until they posted the official ruling. A beginner may have trouble with this card until they have a better understanding of the game, but a more advanced player may find it useful. I have shown this card to newer players and explained how it works. They seemed to understand it well enough and some have even picked it up and played with it. They had additional questions, but with a little explanation, they were able to figure out some strategy and uses for it on their own. I can recommend this card for advanced casual players, and some beginners that have backgrounds in other games.

Batcave: Home Sweet Cave gets a casual play rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Stepford Cuckoos: Celeste from the Marvel Deadpool set.

w-stepford-cuckoos-celeste

Ruling – Ability

Stepford Cuckoos has a When Fielded ability. This type of ability only works when you move the character die into field either from your Reserve Pool by paying its fielding cost or by an ability that specifically tells you to field the character die. Swapping the die into the Field Zone or moving/placing the die by other means will not allow you to use the When Fielded ability.

This ability is not optional, meaning you must do as much as you can of her ability as you’re able to do. If you field her and your opponent doesn’t have any character dice in the Field Zone, you must still move one of your character dice to your Prep Area.

If you only have the Stepford Cuckoos die that you just fielded in the Field Zone, she must target herself. You may choose her as your target for her ability instead of another one of your character dice. Your opponent gets to choose which of their character dice to target. The wording of her ability suggests that each player choose one of their own character dice and not that the controller of Stepford Cuckoos gets to choose both.

Character dice that are moved by the Stepford Cuckoos’ ability are not considered to have been KO’d. You would not gain the benefit of a KO ability, like the ability on Jade: Jennifer-Lynn Hayden.

Stepford Cuckoos’ ability does not say that one player should reveal their choice before the other. If this becomes an issue, the active player should reveal their choice first, since the active player has priority.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Stepford Cuckoos: Celeste is a Mask Character.
~ She has the X-Men affiliation.
~ She has a max dice of four.
~ This card is an Uncommon and is #76 of 124.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Stepford Cuckoos fielded with other characters in the Field Zone.

~ I have one level one Stepford Cuckoos die in the Reserve Pool, and a Sidekick die in the Field Zone. My opponent has two Sidekick dice and an Oracle die in the Field Zone.
~ (Main Step) I field my Stepford Cuckoos. I choose to target Stepford Cuckoos with her ability and my opponent chooses to target one of their Sidekicks. Both dice are then placed in the appropriate Prep Areas.

Example Two:
Stepford Cuckoos fielded with no other characters in the Field Zone.

~ I have one level one Stepford Cuckoos die in the Reserve Pool. There are no other characters in the Field Zone on either side.
~ (Main Step) I field my Stepford Cuckoos. My opponent doesn’t have any characters to move. I only have the Stepford Cuckoos, so I must target her and move her to my Prep Area.

Example Three:
Stepford Cuckoos and KO abilities.

~ I have one level one Stepford Cuckoos die in the Reserve Pool and no characters in the Field Zone. My opponent has a Jade: Jennifer-Lynn Hayden in the Field Zone.
~ (Main Step) I field my Stepford Cuckoos. I only have the Stepford Cuckoos, so I must target her and my opponent must choose Jade, but they will not get to use her ability because she’s not being KO’d.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have an official ruling for this specific card.

You can find a relevant When Fielded ability ruling on Miri Riam: Beacon In The Darkhere.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

I don’t see this card being particularly useful in the current meta. She has the potential to rid the field of troublesome characters without KO’ing them, but your opponent still controls which one of their characters gets targeted by her ability. They could easily target and move a Sidekick instead of their big nasty. She’s rather handy for unique form of ramp, but not completely reliable – and PXG is still legal in the unlimited meta. I don’t think folks should throw her in a box and forget she exists though. There could be a card or cards in a future set that make her very worthwhile. She’s worth keeping in the back of your mind, but she’s not a card I expect to see in many major unlimited format events.

Stepford Cuckoos: Celeste gets a rating of two out of five stars.
2 Stars

Prime Play Rating

I played with this card over the weekend in our Prime event and I absolutely love this card! My only mistake was not using enough of her dice. She’s a form of ramp and partial control in prime. I would definitely recommend her if you’re having trouble purchasing larger characters or having issues with your opponent’s characters that are in the Field. Even though they have the power of choice, you’re still making them choose a character that won’t be in the field the rest of the turn. That’s a tough choice between a Ronin and an Oracle when you know you’re opponent could use attack pumping Globals and they have potential Overcrushing attackers. Her fielding costs make me love her even more, because even on her level three side, I still feel like I’m benefiting from her. I would not be surprised to see Celeste or even Mindee on prime teams. Do not overlook this card – she is worth testing with!

Stepford Cuckoos: Celeste gets a Prime rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Casual Play Rating

The only reason Stepford Cuckoos does not get a five star rating from me is because beginners or newer players may not realize that she can be targeted with her own ability. This could potentially lead to misplays or even a dispute over how her ability is supposed to work. She’s still a great card for a beginner, so long as they understand that she can be your target for her ability. Newer players may not fully understand why you would want to move one of your own characters to the Prep Area, but that’s strategy that comes with experience. I think Celeste is perfect for teaching beginners and newer players about the benefits of having those extra dice in your Prep Area every so often – Especially one that can move an opponent’s character out of the Field Zone. Some players may not realize that they do not get to pick both character dice when they field her, but that’s easily explained. She’s a great card for a new player to add to a team and highly recommend her for players of all skill levels.

Stepford Cuckoos: Celeste gets a casual play rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey from the Marvel Deadpool set.

w-hit-monkey-hes-a-hitman-whos-a-monkey

Ruling – Ability

Hit-Monkey has an ability that can be activated when he’s blocked. When he’s blocked, you may pay a fist energy to assign Hit-Monkey’s combat damage to the defending player as if he wasn’t blocked, but only for that turn.

His combat damage has no effect on the character or characters that block him, because you are using his ability to redirect his combat damage to a different source other than the blockers. Hit-Monkey would not deal damage to his blockers, but they would deal their combat damage to him, possibly KO’ing him.

If you pay the fist to use Hit-Monkey’s ability and an effect would remove his card text, you would no longer be able to assign his damage to your opponent. This is because his card would have been blanked before the Assign Damage portion of the Attack Step. You would only be able to assign damage to the characters blocking Hit-Monkey. You would not get the fist energy spent for his ability back.

It is also important to remember that even though you’re able to assign his combat damage to your opponent, Hit-Monkey is still considered blocked and would gain no benefit from effects that affect unblocked characters.

If the blockers are not able to KO Hit-Monkey, he would return the Field Zone during the Clean Up Step. This is because he was blocked, but not KO’d. It does not matter that he assigned his combat damage somewhere else, only that he was blocked and not KO’d. If he’s KO’d, then he will go to the Prep Area.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey is a Fist Character.
~ He has no affiliation.
~ He has a max dice of four.
~ This card is an Uncommon and is #58 of 124.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example:
Hit-Monkey blocked and not KO’d.

~ I have one level three Hit-Monkey die in the Field Zone and one fist energy in the Reserve Pool. My opponent has one Sidekick in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Hit-Monkey as an attacker, placing his die in the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assigns their Sidekick to block my Hit-Monkey, placing it in front of his die in the Attack Zone. Since Hit-Monkey has been blocked, I can now activate his ability. I spend the fist energy (placing it Out of Play) to activate Hit-Monkey’s ability. Hit-Monkey will now be able to assign his combat damage to my opponent instead of the Sidekick.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I do not use any Action dice or Globals. I pass priority to my opponent and they choose not to use any Globals.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Hit-Monkey assigns his four damage to my opponent. The Sidekick assigns its one damage to Hit-Monkey. Damage resolves simultaneously after it’s been assigned, so my opponent takes four damage and Hit-Monkey takes one damage. Hit-Monkey has a defense of three, so he is not KO’d by the one damage from the Sidekick. The Sidekick is not dealt any damage, so it’s not KO’d.
~ (Clean Up Step) Hit-Monkey is blocked and not KO’d, so he is placed back in the Field Zone. The Sidekick blocked and was not KO’d, so it’s placed back in the Field Zone. All effects end and all dice that are Out of Play are placed in the Used Pile.

Example:
Hit-Monkey blocked and card text is blanked after his ability has been used.

~ I have one level three Hit-Monkey die in the Field Zone. I also have one fist energy and a Flying Car: Buckle Up! action die in the Reserve Pool. My opponent has one Sidekick in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Hit-Monkey as an attacker, placing his die in the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assigns their Sidekick to block my Hit-Monkey, placing it in front of his die in the Attack Zone. Since Hit-Monkey has been blocked, I can now activate his ability. I spend the fist energy (placing it Out of Play) to activate Hit-Monkey’s ability. Hit-Monkey will now be able to assign his combat damage to my opponent instead of the Sidekick.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I use my Flying Car action to give Hit-Monkey a +3A/+3D, but it removes all of Hit-Monkey’s ability text. I pass priority to my opponent and they choose not to use any Globals.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Hit-Monkey assigns his seven damage to Sidekick that’s blocking him. The Sidekick assigns its one damage to Hit-Monkey. Damage resolves simultaneously after it’s been assigned, so the Sidekick takes seven damage and Hit-Monkey takes one damage. Hit-Monkey has a defense of six, so he is not KO’d by the one damage from the Sidekick. The Sidekick has one defense and is KO’d by Hit-Monkey’s seven attack.
~ (Clean Up Step) Hit-Monkey is blocked and not KO’d, so he is placed back in the Field Zone. The Sidekick is placed in the Prep Area because it was KO’d. All effects end and all dice that are Out of Play are placed in the Used Pile.

Official Sources

You can find an official ruling about the card on WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF), here.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

As much as I like this card, I think he’s too difficult to work with in an Unlimited format where there are better cards. His ability is good and I think that the right pilot with the right team build might be able to make him work. It takes special care and specific building to make something like this viable though, so I don’t think he’s a card that will see a lot of Unlimited play in the current meta. He’s still a good card, just not the best choice for this particular format. I don’t think he’s fast enough for the current speed of the meta.

Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Prime Play Rating

I don’t think this card is getting the recognition it deserves for the Prime format. I think this card may see more play, and even a few top positions in some upcoming PDC events. If it doesn’t, I would be very disappointed, but not surprised since he doesn’t get much love anyway. I could be totally wrong about this card, but it seems like such a good card with the current list of available cards. There are still plenty of build options for using a card like this and not a whole lot of ways around it. I suspect Captain Cold’s Cold Gun: Frozen “Firearm” is going to make every team list, but there are ways to play around those. Hit-Monkey may not be everyone’s style, but I think he has great potential and folks would be remiss to not give this card a shot on a team.

Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey. gets a Prime rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Casual Play Rating

It’s not often that a card receives a five star rating from me, especially for a beginning or casual player. I don’t think a card ability can be written any more clear than how this one is written. It even has reminder text that helps remind the player that the combat damage is not dealt to the blocking character(s). The confusion around this card begins when you get into more advanced level of play, like the examples in the WORF ruling. But for beginners and casual players that don’t see a lot of the competitive type cards, this is probably one of the best cards to start someone off with. This character’s ability is great to play on its own or with some combo cards, which is one of the reasons it’s such a good card for beginners. I can easily recommend this card for a player of any skill level.

Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey gets a casual play rating of five out of five stars.
5 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Punisher: War Journal from the Marvel Civil War set.

I’m also adding a new Prime Rating to each of my Confusing Card of the Week articles. They will follow the same rating system as the Unlimited Competitive Rating, since Prime is also a competitive format. You can find a breakdown of how I choose my ratings on my sticky article, Helpful Sites and About this Blog.

w-punisher-war-journal

Ruling – Ability

Punisher has a When Fielded ability. This type of ability only works when you move the character die into field either from your Reserve Pool by paying its fielding cost or by an ability that specifically tells you to field the character die. Swapping the die into the Field Zone or moving/placing the die by other means will not allow you to use the When Fielded ability.

“Field a character at level one from Used Pile.” This type of wording would allow you to use the When Fielded ability.

“Move a character from your Used Pile to the Field Zone at level one.” This type of wording does not allow you to use the When Fielded ability.

Punisher says when you field his die, each non-Sidekick character die that you field for the rest of the turn gains the keyword, Intimidate. Each non-Sidekick character that enters the Field Zone after Punisher will be able to use Intimidate.

Intimidate is a When Fielded ability that allows that character to remove another character die from the Field Zone until end of turn. You can target an opposing character die or one of your own character dice. The removed character die is placed to the side next to your character cards, but do not place it on the character cards. Nothing else can effect the removed dice because they are no longer in the play area.

At the end of turn, the removed character dice will return to the Field Zone at the level they were on when they were removed. These dice do not return until the Clean Up Step, so they will not be eligible as blockers during the Attack Step.

When a character with a When Fielded ability is returned to the Field Zone after being removed by Intimidate, you do not get to activate that ability. The returning character dice are not being fielded.

A character with the Ally keyword would not be able to use the Intimidate granted by Punisher’s ability. When a character with Ally is fielded, they are considered a Sidekick as long as they are in the Field Zone. You are not able to use Intimidate on your characters until they are fielded. If Ally were a triggered ability, like a When Fielded ability, you would be able to choose the order in which they triggered. Ally is a static type effect that happens as soon as the conditions are met. This does not give you a window to use Intimidate.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Punisher: War Journal is a Fist Character.
~ He has the Thunderbolts affiliation.
~ He has a max dice of four.
~ This card is an Uncommon and is #92 of 142.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example:

~ I have a Punisher die, a Sidekick die, an Alfred die, a Wolverine die, an Oracle die, and four fist energy in my Reserve Pool (all my character dice are level one). My opponent has a level three Hulk die and a Sidekick die in the Field Zone.
~ (Main Step) I spend one fist energy (moving it Out of Play) to pay Punisher’s fielding cost, and then field my Punisher die. All non-Sidekick characters that I field for the rest of the turn will gain Intimidate.
~ (Main Step) I spend one fist energy (moving it Out of Play) to use the Global on Anger Issues and target my Punisher die to give him +1A (for a current total of 5A).
~ (Main Step) I field my Sidekick. The Sidekick does not get to use Intimidate.
~ (Main Step) I field my Alfred. He is an Ally as he enters the Field Zone, so he does not get to use Intimidate.
~ (Main Step) I spend one fist energy (moving it Out of Play) to field my Wolverine die. He is not a Sidekick, so he gets to use Intimidate. I target my opponent’s Hulk die and my opponent moves that die next to my character cards, showing that it’s removed from play.
~ (Main Step) I field my Oracle die. She is not a Sidekick, so she gets to use Intimidate. I target my opponent’s Sidekick die and place it next to their Hulk die.
~ (Main Step) I pass priority to my opponent. My opponent does not use any Globals, and passes priority back.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Punisher, Wolverine, and Sidekick as attackers.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent does not have any characters to block with.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I spend my last fist energy (moving it Out of Play) to use the Global on Anger Issues and target my Punisher die to give him +1A (for a total of 6A). I pass priority to my opponent to give them an opportunity to use Globals. They do not use any and pass priority back to me.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) All of my attackers are unblocked and assign their damage to my opponent. Punisher would deal six damage, Wolverine would deal four damage, and the Sidekick would deal one damage, for a total of eleven damage. These unblocked characters are now placed Out of Play.
~ (Clean Up Step) All dice that are Out of Play are moved to the Used Pile. All effects end (unless otherwise stated). The two characters removed from play by Intimidate are placed back in the Field Zone on their previous levels.


Official Sources

You can find an official ruling about the card on WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF), here.

You can find an official definition for Intimidate on the Keywords Page.

You can find additional information on Intimidate in The Reserve Pool’s Lexicon page, here.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

I do not see this character making it onto any competitive unlimited team. He cost high, his TFC isn’t good for what his ability does, and he is conditional. I say he’s conditional because there are plenty of competitive teams that don’t need active character dice and not many (if any) of your own characters that benefit from returning to play without being ‘fielded’. Vicious Struggle teams don’t normally field any characters. Other teams would likely not be threatened by the temporary removal of their characters. It might be an annoyance for the one turn, but then you would need to cycle Punisher, and any other characters you’re using with him. If WizKids rules that you can use Allies with Punisher, then that may make him a little better, but still not a card I’d consider for a competitive format.

Punisher: War Journal gets a rating of zero out of five stars.
0 Stars

Prime Play Rating

With the loss of Elf Thief and the lack of cost reduction, this card does not seem very useful in Prime. I will admit, he’s more appealing for a Prime format where you’ll likely see more teams with characters that stay fielded, but you still need to work hard – probably harder – to get this crazy combo to go off. I wouldn’t expect to see him in any top teams in the Prime format either. There are still much better options for crazy combos, and even fun combos that require much less work and are not as frustrating to get functioning.

Punisher: War Journal gets a Prime rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Casual Play Rating

I don’t particularly like Punisher for casual play either. His ability can be confusing and difficult to use in a casual setting. A more experienced player could use this card as a teaching tool, but I think there are better alternatives for that. I think the right pilot could run a team with him and cheap fielding characters effectively, but it still would require specific card choices and a really good understanding of the game. If you’re playing in a casual setting and you want to try something different, then maybe this card could give you that. I can’t recommend this card for a brand new player, but more experienced players might be able to build a fun team with him.

Punisher: War Journal gets a casual play rating of two out of five stars.
2 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
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Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

We finally got our Speedsters Organized Play Kit in this week, and just in time for the weekend!

Participation Card

Jay Garrick: Leadfoot Blank Sketch Card is the participation card. I did a CCW article for this particular card and you can find it here. Jay Garrick is a reprint of the Jay Garrick: Leadfoot card from the Green Arrow and The Flash set.

w-jay-garrick-leadfoot

My ratings for this card are the same as the ones in my CCW article. I haven’t changed my mind on those but at the time I wrote my CCW article, the PDC Prime format hadn’t been announced yet.

Jay Garrick: Leadfoot Prime Rating

So, I really like this card for Unlimited. I like it even more for Prime. There are plenty of Globals that players can abuse in Prime and Jay Garrick can help you stop them from using them, or at least force them to pay more of their energy to use them. As previously mentioned in my Unlimited rating, he works great with S.T.A.R. Labs Global. If you don’t use that energy for Jay Garrick, you can potentially use it to shuffle some Sidekicks around. I don’t think he’ll be on every team, but he’s totally worth checking out, especially for those nasty characters that have an ability that only Crossover characters can affect. Do not overlook this character for Prime – he might be the piece you need.

Jay Garrick: Leadfoot gets a rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Fellowship Card

Barry Allen: Fastest Man Alive is the Fellowship card. Lots of venues and TO’s determine who gets Fellowship in different ways. I’ve seen folks draw names, vote, roll dice, or even give it to the last place player. At our venue, we have everyone who is eligible roll a D20. The player that rolls the highest number gets the Fellowship card.

w-barry-allen-fastest-man-alive

Barry Allen is a Bolt and Fist Crossover character with the Justice League affiliation. Crossover characters must be purchased with at least one of each of their energy types. You are allowed to use Wild energy to purchase a Crossover character. For example: If you had three Fist energy, one Shield energy, and one Wild energy, you would be able to purchase Barry Allen because the Wild counts for the Bolt requirement of his purchase cost. He’s also got a max dice of three – worth noting because many OP exclusive cards have different max dice counts. His dice can be found in the Green Arrow and The Flash set.

Barry Allen has the Fast keyword, which allows him to deal his combat damage before other characters that don’t have Fast. If there are multiple characters with Fast, they all deal their combat damage at the same time, before other characters without Fast.

He has another ability that says Villain characters with the Fast keyword deal no damage to Barry Allen dice. This ability does not specify combat damage or ability damage, so any Villain with Fast that can deal ability damage to Barry Allen dice, would not be able to. This also prevents Barry Allen dice from taking combat damage as a blocker or if he’s blocked by a Villain with Fast.

Competitive Rating

For an unlimited setting, this is probably one of the better Barry Allen/Flash characters, but he would require your opponent’s character to have Fast and be a Villain. There are multiple ways to make characters Villains, but only one way that I can find at the moment to give an opponent’s character Fast. This is totally a conditional card. I love that he has Fast built in, his cost can be reduced, his attack stats are really good, his defense isn’t terrible, and his fielding costs aren’t the worst. I don’t see him making it into the meta though.

Barry Allen: Fastest Man Alive gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Prime Rating

For Prime, there are way more options for playable characters with Fast and some are even Villains already. As for ways to give a character the Villain affiliation, not so much so. But I think this card may be able to squeak his way out as a heavy attacker since he already has Fast. Another benefit is that he’s a Crossover character. Like I mentioned above with Jay Garrick, this could be useful against certain teams that benefit from their opponent not using Crossover characters. And while cost reducers are far and few between in Prime, Barry Allen only costs five energy, which is very affordable in the Prime format. I wouldn’t overlook this card, but I don’t think he’s the next big OP card.

Barry Allen: Fastest Man Alive gets a rating of two out of five stars.
2 Stars

Casual Rating

Barry Allen’s abilities are not overly complicated for a beginner to understand. He doesn’t have reminder text for Fast, but finding a definition for it is not a problem. WizKids keeps their Keywords Page updated and that’s where I would suggest players go to find information on keywords they aren’t familiar with. The Reserve Pool has an extended Lexicon page in their Wiki, which is the next place I would suggest players go. Both of those sites are extremely useful for players of all skill levels. Barry’s other ability might be slightly confusing at first for a brand new player, but a little explanation about the Villain affiliation should clear it up quickly. The part about damage is fairly clear, since it doesn’t say only combat damage or only ability damage, but a newer player may not realize he prevents ability damage from Fast Villains. I think this is a great card to use for damage type examples and I don’t think he’s too confusing for a newer player, after his abilities are explained. But because he needs to be explained so much, I can only give him a rating of three stars. If WizKids used the same Villain affiliation symbol for all Villains, I may have been able to bump him up to four stars. The different Villain affiliation symbols still cause confusion among new players, especially when an ability uses only one of the symbols, like Barry’s.

Barry Allen: Fastest Man Alive gets a rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

First Place Prize Card

Professor Zoom: Thief is the first place prize card. To get this card, you’ll have to place first out of all the players in the tournament. With myself and Mr. DDK, if we win first place, we always forfeit the first place OP card to the next player. Sometimes, our other players that have won the card in a previous event will pass it down if they win a second event.

w-professor-zoom-thief

Professor Zoom is a Fist character with the Villain affiliation. Like Barry Allen, he’s got a max dice of three and his dice can be found in the Green Arrow and The Flash set.

Professor Zoom also has the Fast keyword, like Barry Allen.

Professor Zoom’s second ability says that you can pay two less for the turn, to purchase his dice as long as you use a Cosmic Treadmill die. Cosmic Treadmill is a Non-Basic Action from the Green Arrow and The Flash set and it has a common, uncommon, and rare version. You would need to use the Cosmic Treadmill die before attempting to purchase a Professor Zoom die.

Competitive Rating

I don’t see this card hitting any unlimited competitive team. His purchase cost is too high for his stats and the only beneficial ability he has is Fast. His other ability requires you to bring, purchase, roll, and then use a Non-Basic Action that may not be worth considering for the current unlimited meta. I don’t see this card being a good consideration for any unlimited team, even if the team was built around it – I think it would be way too slow to be effective.

Professor Zoom: Thief gets a rating of zero out of five stars.
0 Stars

Prime Rating

I think that the limited amount of cards in the Prime meta could be beneficial to higher cost cards like this. Sure, he requires the Cosmic Treadmill to be completely useful, but someone out there could possibly build a Prime team around Cosmic Treadmill and Professor Zoom. Cosmic Treadmill: Antique Shop Discovery could be a particularly great card with Multiple Man, while also allowing you to purchase a Professor Zoom die. I wouldn’t completely overlook this card, especially since he’s already got Fast and his cost can be reduced. You could potentially roll up a Fast 5A/5D character that only cost one to field. I like him for Prime and may even play around with him for my Prime team.

Professor Zoom: Thief gets a rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Casual Rating

I like this card for beginners. It points the player directly to another card in a current set and the player gets a benefit from actually purchasing and using that die. I think I love this card! Professor Zoom’s abilities are not hard to understand and don’t need lots of explanation. Even though the reminder text is not present for Fast, it’s not difficult to grab a current rulebook or even check the previously mentioned sites for reference on how Fast works. I could definitely recommend this card for a player of any skill level.

Professor Zoom: Thief gets a rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Final Thoughts

For those without a local scene, are they worth traveling for? It really depends on the individual. If you gotta have every blank sketch variant, then you should be looking for these events in WIN. If you love every Barry Allen/Flash card ever, you better be looking for the events too. If you’re looking for the best meta cards, you may be able to pass on this event – if you would have to travel.

If your local scene is hosting Speedster events, I would definitely encourage every local to try and attend the events. While I don’t think these are meta breaking cards, I think there is some level of playable material in the kit. I like all of the cards for different reasons, and while Barry Allen may be confusing for some new players, you should totally try to get one if you love Barry Allen as a character.

This is a decent kit for Speedster fans with three well-known characters to comic and TV series fans alike. I like the character choices and I love the connecting art on Professor Zoom and Barry Allen. I like that Jay Garrick is the sketch variant, because I’m totally gonna try to get a John Wesley Shipp version done. I liked him much better as Jay Garrick than as the Flash – but that 90’s Flash series was fun to watch!

John Wesley Shipp Comparison.jpg

Which card do you like from this kit?
Which card do you think may see meta play, unlimited or Prime?Leave me a comment here or on Facebook and let me know!

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Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!