Posts Tagged ‘WORF’

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Rip Hunter: Navigate the Sands of Time  from the DC Batman set.

Rip Hunter, Navigate the Sands of Time

 

Ruling – Ability

Rip Hunter’s ability is a While Active ability. A While Active ability is one that works regardless of how many of the character’s dice are in the Field Zone. While Active abilities are like a light – it’s either on, or it’s off.

while-active-light

Rip Hunter’s ability can only be used once during your turn and only during the Clear and Draw Step. Rip Hunter must be active at the start of your turn to be able to use his ability that same turn. To use Rip Hunter’s ability, you draw dice for your Clear and Draw Step, and then you can send any number of those dice to the Used Pile and draw that many dice. You may choose any number of the dice you’ve drawn to go the Used Pile. You do not have to send them all.

The dice that you send to the Used Pile, go directly to the Used Pile and not Out of Play. This is because those dice have not entered the Reserve Pool.

If a card ability would allow you to draw extra dice during the Clear and Draw Step, you can use Rip Hunter’s ability for those dice as well. For example, if you have a Swarm trigger that allowed you to draw an extra die, for a total of five dice, you can send all five dice to the Used Pile and then draw five more dice using Rip Hunter’s ability. If any of those dice have the Swarm keyword and match an active character of the same name, you get to trigger Swarm again.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Rip Hunter is a Shield type character card.
~ He does not have any affiliation.
~ He has a max dice of four.
~ This card is a Common and is #30 of 124.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Using Rip Hunter’s ability.

Game State
~
I have two Rip Hunter dice and a Sidekick die active. I have seven Sidekick dice and one Batman die in my bag.
~ It’s the beginning of my turn.
(Clear and Draw)
~ I don’t have any dice to clear.
~ I draw four Sidekick dice.
~ I use Rip Hunter’s ability, sending three of my Sidekick dice to the Used Pile and I draw three more dice.
~ I draw two Sidekick dice and my Batman die.

Example Two:
Rip Hunter’s ability with Swarm.

Game State
~ I have one Multiple Man: Pile On! die, one Goblin: Lesser Humanoid die, and two Sidekick dice active in the Field Zone.
~ I have a Goblin, Multiple Man, and four Sidekick dice in my bag, and two Sidekick dice in my Use Pile.
~ It’s the beginning of my turn.
(Clear and Draw)
~ I draw four dice: one Multiple Man, one Goblin, two Sidekick dice.
~ I trigger the Swarm ability on Multiple Man and Goblin and draw two more dice: two Sidekicks.
~ I use Rip Hunter’s ability and send Multiple Man and Goblin to the Used Pile.
~ I now draw two more dice, but my bag is empty, so I refill it with the Used Pile (two Sidekicks, Multiple Man, and Goblin). I draw a Goblin and a Sidekick.
~ I trigger Swarm on the Goblin die, drawing one more die – Multiple Man.
~ I trigger Swarm on the Multiple Man die and draw my last die, which is a Sidekick.
(Roll and Reroll)
~ I roll all eight dice and proceed with the rest of my turn.

 

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF)
You can find the official ruling, here.

Basic Information

You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Opinion and Strategy

I will continue to stand by my opinion that the dice moved by Rip Hunter need to go Out of Play. I’ve seen Ultraman abuse this to devastating results, as well as Parademon Swarm Burn. However, I will never rule against anything that’s been officially ruled on by WORF and I completely understand the reasoning behind their ruling. I just think it’s absolutely silly.

That being said, Parademon’s Burning Swarm is a team that Mr. DDK and I have been discussing since before they officially ruled Rip Hunter. I really want to use Darkseid: Force of Entropy with Parademon: Strength in Numbers and a cheap Swarm dude, like Multiple Man: Pile On!, because that’s just too silly. Rip Hunter’s ability can make a team like that more lethal. I’ve already played against someone that’s headed that direction with their team anyway, and the Parademon with Goblin Swarm is bad enough.

Rip Hunter has his benefits outside of breaking things. He’s exceptionally handy in drafts and he makes for a great addition to many teams that are desperately missing their PXG Global. He’s obviously not as good as PXG, but it’s totally better than nothing! I’ve been using the Uncommon Rip Hunter with my New Gods, but I might have to swap him for this version, unless I can speed the team up some other way.

I think that Rip Hunter is a good card in the competitive scene, but he does cost four to purchase. It’s not too much, but it could be too slow to use against some teams. Be sure you’re not adding him to your team as a necessary purchase, because if you’re buying him, you’re not buying your win condition (unless he contributes to that win condition). Your team shouldn’t be relying on him to function. If you’re using the rare Dwarf Wizard, this is probably going to be the character you want to target, unless of course there is a much larger threat at the time. But using DWiz to slow their churn is a really good idea early in the game.

If you’re playing casual, he’s a great addition and I don’t think he should be overlooked. He could help some of those casual teams churn through their dice a little faster to get to the good stuff!

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Dove: Danger!  from the DC Batman set.

Dove, Danger

 

Ruling – Ability

Dove has a special ability that does not require her to be active to use. Dove’s ability says that if she’s in your Used Pile and you take damage, you move her die to your Prep Area. Most of the abilities in the game require that the character be active to use their abilities, but her ability does not say While Active.

Dove’s ability is not optional. If you take damage, you must move Dove to your Prep Area.

Dove’s ability will trigger from any kind of damage, like ability or combat. Any ability or effect that makes you lose a life or pay life will not trigger her ability.

Ruling – Global

To use the Global on a card, you only need to pay the cost. The die does not need to be active to use the Global, unless it specifically says so.

Dove’s Global says that an attacking character die will get -1A when you pay a Shield. You can pay for her Global as many times as you have the energy to do so. Each time that you use her Global, the target attacking character die will get a -1 to their attack.

You do not have to target the same character die if you use her Global more than once.

You cannot use her Global during the Main Step, because there aren’t any attacking characters to target.   Her Global can only be used during the Actions and Globals portion of the Attack Step, and only to target an attacking character die. A character that is not attacking cannot be targeted.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Dove is a Shield type character card.
~ She has the Teen Titans affiliation.
~ She has a max dice of four.
~ This card is a Uncommon and is #53 of 124.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Dove’s ability used during the Attack Step.

Game State
~
I have one Dove die in my Used Pile and no character dice in the Field Zone.
~
My opponent has a Sidekick in the Field Zone.
(Attack Step – Assign Attackers)
~ My opponent assigns their Sidekick die to attack, moving it into the Attack Zone.
(Attack Step – Assign Blockers)
~ I do not have any character dice to assign as blockers.
(Attack Step – Actions and Globals)
~ My opponent does not use any Actions or Globals.
~ I do not use any Globals.
(Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage)
~ Because the Sidekick is unblocked, it deals one damage to me and goes Out of Play.
~ Dove’s ability will trigger, allowing me to move her die from the Used Pile to the Prep Area.

Example Two:
Dove’s ability used during the Main Step.

Game State
~ I have one Dove die in my Used Pile, a Fist energy in my Reserve Pool, and Luke Cage: Bulletproof is on my opponent’s team.
~ It’s during my Main Step.
(Main Step)
~ I pay a Fist energy (placing it Out of Play) to use Luke Cage’s Global, dealing one damage to both players.
~ Dove’s ability triggers, allowing me to move her die from the Used Pile to the Prep Area.

Example Three:
Dove’s Global Timing.

Game State
~ I have a Sidekick in the Field Zone. I have Dove: Danger! on my team, but have not purchased any of her dice yet.
~ My opponent has a Sidekick in the Field Zone and a Shield energy in their Reserve Pool.
~ It’s my turn and we’re headed into the Attack Step.
(Attack Step – Assign Attackers)
~ I assign my Sidekick to attack, moving it into the Attack Zone.
(Attack Step – Assign Blockers)
~ My opponent assigns their Sidekick to block, moving it into the Attack Zone and placing it in front of my Sidekick.
(Attack Step – Actions and Globals)
~ I do not use any Actions or Globals.
~ My opponent spends their Shield energy (moving it to their Used Pile) to pay for Dove’s Global and targets my Sidekick. My Sidekick now has a -1 to its attack, making its attack a 0.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF)
You can find the official ruling, here.

Basic Information

You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Opinion and Strategy

So, I’m brewing a new Teen Titans team and this is one of the Dove cards that I’m considering. I want to pair her with Hawk: Might Makes Right. My only concern in using this particular version of Dove is that my opponent can use her Global against me when I attack with Hawk. I’ve been thinking about adding Raven: Azrath, Metrion, Zinthos! to the team to protect my Teen Titans from Dove’s Global, but I’m not completely sure if want another character that I need to purchase on the team. Using this Dove won’t backfire on me that much though, because my main damage is done during the Main Step – with Hawk’s ability. I use Dove and a Sidekick to Fabricate a Golem and because Dove is KO’d for the Fabricate ability, Hawk’s ability triggers. Dove’s Global is only usable during the Attack Step, and even if it wasn’t, my opponent would still have to wait for me to pass them priority.

I’m just so torn between this Dove and the rare version of her. I like being able to spin her up, but I think I like being able to move her from my Used Pile to my Prep Area better. That makes my opponent think a little harder about swinging with a Sidekick while I have Dove in my Used Pile.

I’m also thinking about ways to utilize her ability that won’t necessarily be accessible to my opponent. For example, Luke Cage is not the character I want to use. I don’t want my opponent having access to a Global like that. I’ve thought about Rocket Raccoon: Not a Raccoon. I think he might be more useful and help me control when I trigger her ability without giving my opponent full access to a burn Global.

I like this Dove and the more I think about it, the more I like her. I don’t think she’ll see much play in the major competitive metas, but for casual play, she’s definitely a great Teen Titan to consider. I can’t wait to finish brewing this team and put it together!

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Hellcat: It’s Patsy!  from the Marvel Defenders Team Pack.

07 Hellcat, It's Patsy

Ruling – Ability

Hellcat has two different types of abilities on her card. One is a When Fielded ability and the other is a While Active ability.

Hellcat’s When Fielded Ability

A When Fielded ability only triggers when the character die is placed into the Field Zone from the Reserve Pool by paying it’s fielding cost, or by a card ability that specifically says to ‘field’ the character die and not move or place the character die.

Hellcat’s When Fielded ability says that you must name a target opposing non-Sidekick character when you field her die, which will replace any previous choices. Hellcat can only target an opposing non-Sidekick character die that’s in the Field Zone for her ability.

A character with the Ally Keyword can not be targeted by Hellcat because Ally means that the dice is considered a Sidekick while in the Field Zone.

If you field a second Hellcat die while one is still active, you can name the same target opposing character. For example: I field Hellcat and name Batman. In the same turn, I field a second Hellcat and name Batman again.

Hellcat’s When Fielded ability is not optional and must be used if there is a legal target.

Hellcat’s While Active Ability

The second ability on Hellcat is her While Active ability. A While Active ability is one that works regardless of how many of the character’s dice are in the Field Zone. While Active abilities are like a light – it’s either on, or it’s off.

while-active-light

Hellcat’s While Active ability says that your opponent is dealt two damage the first time that they field the named character die. Your opponent will take that two damage each turn, but only the first time they field the character that Hellcat targeted with her When Fielded ability.

Hellcat’s While Active ability is not optional. If Hellcat is active and your opponent fields the named character, they must take two damage. The damage can be redirected, reduced, etc with other game effects or abilities.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Hellcat is a Mask type character card.
~ She has the Defenders affiliation.
~ She has a max dice of four.
~ This card is a Common and is #7 of 24.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example:
Using Hellcat.

Game State
~
I have a level one Hellcat die and a Fist energy in my Reserve Pool.
~ My opponent has an Alfred die and a level one Batman: Speedy Recovery die in the Field Zone.
~ It’s during my Main Step.
(Main Step)
~ I spend my one Fist energy, moving it Out of Play, to pay for Hellcat’s fielding cost.
~ I move Hellcat to the Field Zone and activate her When Fielded ability.
~ There is only one legal target for her ability, which is Batman. I can’t target Alfred because he’s an Ally and considered a Sidekick.
~ I pass priority to my opponent and they do not use any Globals, passing priority back to me.
~ I decide not to attack, so the Attack Step is bypassed and we proceed into the Clean Up Step.
(Clean Up Step)
~ All dice Out of Play are moved to the Used Pile.
~ All effects end unless otherwise stated.

Now my opponent begins their turn.
(Clear and Draw)
~ My opponent moves leftover dice from their Reserve Pool into their Used Pile.
~ My opponent draws four dice; two Sidekicks and two Batman dice.
(Roll and Reroll)
~ My opponent rolls their dice and they get two level one Batman characters, a Fist on a Sidekick die, and a Mask on a Sidekick die.
~ They choose to not reroll any of their dice.
(Main Step)
~ My opponent pays a Fist energy, moving it Out of Play, to pay for one of the Batman’s fielding costs.
~ They field the Batman die and Hellcat’s While Active ability triggers.
~ My opponent takes two damage, which will trigger Batman’s Vengeance ability – “Whenever you take damage, KO a Batman die and return it to the Field Zone at level 2.”
~ My opponent chooses to KO the Batman die they just fielded and then return him to the Field Zone at level two.
~ My opponent pays a Mask energy, moving it Out of Play, to pay for the other Batman’s fielding cost.
~ They field the Batman die on his level one side. Hellcat’s ability will not trigger again because my opponent has already fielded a Batman this turn.

As long as Hellcat remains active with Batman as her target, my opponent will take two damage the first time they field a Batman die – every turn.

Official Sources

You can find a ruling about this card here, on WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF).

You can find more info about specific Keywords on the WizKids Keywords page.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Opinion

I was very confused about Hellcat’s While Active ability and took it to WORF – adding in a few other questions about her that the locals were asking too. I’m so glad they returned with an answer as quick as they did. Thanks WizKids!

I do not like her anywhere near as much as Lyssa Drak and as long as Lyssa is in Modern, I don’t see any good reason to use this Hellcat. She’ll likely be the Lyssa replacement when War of Light eventually rotates from Modern. As for Prime, I’m not sure if she’s worth playing or not. She’s worth testing out for Prime, and it will likely come down to the individual’s style of play.

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Iron Spider: Waldoes  from the Iron Man and War Machine Starter set.

W 11 Iron Spider, Waldoes

Ruling – Suit Up Keyword

Suit Up is a new Keyword in the Iron Man and War Machine starter. Suit Up is an optional ability that allows you to field a die you just purchased by KO’ing another die. Suit Up only works for specific characters listed after the Suit Up keyword. For example, Iron Spider has Suit Up – Iron Spider or Spider-Man. When you purchase an Iron Spider die, you can KO an active Iron Spider die or a Spider-Man die to field the newly purchased die at level two. You can only KO character dice that you control for Suit Up.

A die that you field using Suit Up counts as being fielded for abilities that reference fielding.

The die you KO for a Suit Up ability counts as being KO’d for abilities that reference a character die being KO’d. Example: Vibranium Shield: Deflecting Bullets‘s ability would trigger when an Iron Spider or Spider-Man is KO’d for Iron Spider’s Suit Up.

The character die that is KO’d for the Suit Up ability must match the name. For example, you couldn’t KO an Iron Spidey die for Iron Spider’s Suit Up. Also, you wouldn’t be able to KO a Space Armor Iron Man for Suit Up – Iron Man.

* Note! *
You can use both Iron Spidey and Iron Spider on the same team. You cannot use Iron Spidey for Suit Up – Iron Spider. Iron Spidey is a different name from Iron Spider.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Iron Spider is a Fist Character.
~ He has the Stark Industries and Spider-Friends affiliations.
~ He has a max dice of four.
~ This card is a Common and is #11 of 34.

If you purchase the Iron Man and War Machine starter set, you will get all the cards, but not maximum dice for each character. You will need two starters for maximum character dice because those dice are not available in any other set.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Using Suit Up.

~ I have one level two Iron Spidey and one level one Iron Spider die in the Field Zone. At the beginning of my Main Step, I have a Sidekick, two Fist energy, and a Mask energy in my Reserve Pool.
~ (Main Step) I decide to field my Sidekick by moving it from the Reserve Pool to the Field Zone. The fielding cost is zero, so I do not need to pay energy to field the Sidekick.
~ (Main Step) I decide to purchase another Iron Spider die. I spend all three of my energy (moving it Out of Play). I decide to use Suit Up on Iron Spider. I KO my level one Iron Spider die that’s in the Field Zone and then field my newly purchased Iron Spider at level two.

Example Two:
Missing the Suit Up window.

~ I have one level two Iron Spidey and one level one Iron Spider die in the Field Zone. At the beginning of my Main Step, I have a Sidekick, two Fist energy, and a Mask energy in my Reserve Pool.
~ (Main Step) I decide to purchase another Iron Spider die. I spend all three of my energy (moving it Out of Play) and placing the Iron Spider die in my Used Pile.
~ (Main Step) I decide to field my Sidekick by moving it from the Reserve Pool to the Field Zone. The fielding cost is zero, so I do not need to pay energy to field the Sidekick. I realize that I forgot to use Suit Up on Iron Spider. I have to use Suit Up at the time I purchase the die, meaning the window to use Suit Up has passed. I am not allowed to use Suit Up and must continue with my turn.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have a ruling for this specific card.

You can find a relevant ruling regarding character names, here.

*EDIT*
New ruling from WORF today, here.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Ratings

You can find a guide to my ratings, here.
These are personal opinion of the card being showcased and not an official reflection of current major meta.

Golden Age Rating

While this ability is definitely unique and interesting, this is not a card I see being used in Golden Age. He’s a cheaper character with big attack stats, but his defense could get him blown up quickly and he doesn’t have any other benefit, like Fast. With Bard being the big dog in Golden Age, this card just doesn’t have its own place. It could be used on Bard teams, for that extra pow, but his fielding costs are a whole other issue. Bard teams like cheap to buy and cheap to field. He doesn’t quite fit the bill for Golden Age.

Iron Spider: Waldoes gets a rating of zero out of five stars.
0 Stars

Modern Age Rating

I don’t know if this card can find a place in Modern Age either. I think if someone is going to use Suit Up, it’s going to be on a different card, like Rescue or Space Armor Iron Man. He is a cheaper character, but we do have Unstable Canister in Modern. His highest defense is three – totally in the range to be blown up, which is very possible since Superwoman is a Modern Age card. There are still cheap cards in Modern Age with better stats and just as useful or better abilities that you could put in place of this particular card.

Iron Spider: Waldoes gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Prime Rating

As the pool of cards narrows, this card begins to look better, but still not completely awesome. Cheaper characters with decent abilities begin to get scarce when you approach Prime. One of the unfortunate things about this card for Prime is that there aren’t any decent Spider-Man characters to pair him with. We are limited to the three from Civil War and they aren’t the greatest with two of them being five costs and one being a four cost character. His stats aren’t any better than Iron Spider’s either. While I still don’t like him for Prime, he’s got the best chance in this format to make it on a competitive team.

Iron Spider: Waldoes gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Casual Play Rating

Suit Up has a well written description on most of the Suit Up cards. I don’t think it’s too confusing of an ability, but many players do ask about using characters like Iron Spidey for Suit Up – Iron Spider and Space Armor Iron Man for Suit Up – Iron Man. After explaining that the names on the cards must match the names on the ability, players usually don’t have any further issues with it. I really like this card for casual play. He’s cheap and has big attack stats. That’s something that appeals to many beginners, and he also has a cool ability that could easily be used as a teaching tool for strategy and tactics. I can easily recommend this card for players of all skill levels.

Iron Spider: Waldoes gets a rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?

Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

This is the corrected article. Thanks to Michaela for making me think about my original ruling and dig a little deeper!

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Howard Stark: Expert Businessman  from the Marvel Iron Man and War Machine Starter set.

w-02-howard-stark-expert-businessman

Ruling – Ally

Ally is a keyword that means the character will count as a Sidekick in addition to any other type that it currently has, but only while the character is active in the Field Zone. A character with the Ally keyword does not count as a Sidekick in the bag, Prep Area, Reserve Pool, etc.

A character with Ally will become a Sidekick the very moment that it enters the Field Zone. This is not an optional keyword and you cannot trigger it because it applies the instant the character is fielded. This matters specifically for abilities like the one on Punisher: War Journal.

Ruling – Ability

Howard Stark’s ability is definitely a interesting one. You can only use it at the beginning of your turn, before you start your Clear and Draw Step. You can sacrifice a Howard Stark die to give the characters your active characters that you control a +2A for the rest of the turn. You may sacrifice any number of Howard Stark dice and each will give a +2A, but you must do it before your Clear and Draw Step. This ability is optional to use. If you start your Clear and Draw Step and didn’t sacrifice a Howard Stark die first, you cannot back up because you missed the timing window for his ability.

When you sacrifice a character die, that die goes Out of Play until the Clean Up Step where it then goes to the Used Pile. When a die is Out of Play, game effects cannot affect those dice. Examples – Professor X: Recruiting Young Mutants Global cannot be used on Sidekicks Out of Play and Reclaim cannot be used to get a Howard Stark die into the Prep Area on the same turn it was sacrificed.

The buff that Howard Stark’s effect gives affects all characters you have active in the Field Zone at the time you sacrifice his die. Each of his dice that you sacrifice will give your active characters a +2A. If you sacrifice two Howard Stark dice, you characters that are in the Field Zone will get a +4A until the end of your turn. This type of ability is an applied bonus.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Howard Stark is a Mask Character.
~ He has the S.H.I.E.L.D. affiliation.
~ He has a max dice of four.
~ This card is a Common and is #2 of 34.

If you purchase the Iron Man and War Machine starter set, you will get all the cards, but not maximum dice for each character. You will need two starters for maximum character dice because those dice are not available in any other set.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Sacrificing more than one Howard Stark.

~ I have two level one Howard Stark dice and three Sidekick dice in the Field Zone.
~ I begin my turn by sacrificing one of my Howard Stark dice. This will give my three Sidekick dice a +2A until end of turn. I sacrifice my second Howard Stark die, giving my Sidekick dice an additional +2A for a total of +4A until end of turn.
~ (Clear and Draw Step) I clear any dice remaining in my Reserve Pool from the previous turn and draw four dice from my bag. Any character dice that I draw, roll, and field, will not get the +4A buff.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have a ruling for this specific card.

You can find an Ally ruling in the Punisher: War Journal ruling, and many other rulings, here.

You can find a ruling about Sacrifice, here.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

While I think this card is quite good, I don’t see anyone playing it unless Bard gets an errata or somehow makes the banned list (not likely). He costs one less than Bard, but you have to sacrifice him for his ability. Someone like me would try to use Stark in a major event, but I don’t see him making many team lists out there. There are better options for his type of ability – the big one being Bard. He does have the advantage of getting around Cold Guns though, so he’s not a card I’d forget about anytime soon just on the chance that we see a WizKids rotation that hits Bard.

Howard Stark: Expert Businessman gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Prime Play Rating

I think this card is great for Prime, but I don’t expect a lot of folks to play him if they aren’t using Overcrush. He’s got great fielding costs, especially since you may be sacrificing him! But if you’re using Reclaim, he could easily be churned many times over for some pretty devastating results. Just remember that you don’t want a Reclaim die the same turn you sacrifice him, because he’ll be Out of Play on the turn he’s sacrificed. I have the perfect place for this card on my Grodd team and I can’t wait to try him out.

Howard Stark: Expert Businessman gets a Prime rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Casual Play Rating

Howard Stark’s ability is absolutely confusing. I’m not sure why I thought it was a static type bonus, but he had all of us here confused. Thankfully, Michaela mentioned that it might be applied and not static, which got me to thinking and digging deeper. Glad she said something! So, Stark is lucky I don’t knock him down to a three for causing so much confusion. The needed knowledge for sacrifice can be obtained easily if the player is looking for it. Some new players may confuse sacrificing for KO’ing, but once they know the difference, it’s not usually an issue. Lots of players forget or don’t know that sacrificed characters go Out of Play instead of the directly to the Used Pile. It’s a common mistake among players of all skill levels. I can still easily recommend Howard Stark for players of all skill levels, even with his earlier confusion. He’s a great card, and he offers a great way to showcase the rarely used game mechanic, sacrifice.

Howard Stark: Expert Businessman gets a casual play rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Mistakes Were Made!

And this goes to show everyone – I absolutely do make mistakes. I’m definitely not perfect and for all my understanding of the game, this one card tripped me up today. I’m a one person operation here, but I will usually consult with Mr. DDK and a few of the other locals that are more competitive for their opinions, just to be sure I’ve got my interpretation right. Very rarely do we have this issue, but Howard Stark had all of us fooled today! But I’m still so glad I picked him for the Confusing Card of the Week. Never be afraid to question things you think may not be accurate. You could save someone a world of problems, like Michaela did for me today! And don’t be ashamed or embarrassed by a mistake. Admit the mistake, pick yourself up, and roll on!

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at the Renet Tilley: 79th Dimension of Null-Time from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Heroes in a Half Shell box set.

w-35-renet-tillet-79th-dimension-of-null-time

Ruling – Ability

Renet Tilley has a While Active ability. A While Active ability is one that works regardless of how many of the character’s dice are in the Field Zone. While Active abilities are like a light – it’s either on, or it’s off.

while-active-light

Renet Tilley’s ability lets you spin an action die that’s on an action face to any other side, but only right after you complete your Roll and Reroll Step and before you begin your Main Step. The action die must be on a non-energy face for you to be able to use her ability for that die. You can spin the die to any energy face or any action face.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Renet Tilley is a Bolt Character.
~ She does not have an affiliation.
~ She has a max dice of three.
~ This card is a Common and is #35 of 58.

If you purchase either of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Box Sets, you will have one copy of each card in the entire set, as well as the maximum number of dice for each card.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Using Renet Tilley for one Action Die.

~ I have one level one Renet Tilley in the Field Zone.
~ (Clear and Draw Step) I draw four dice from my bag. I draw two Captain Cold’s Cold Gun action dice and two Sidekick dice.
~ (Roll and Reroll Step) I roll my four dice and they land on two Wild energy, one Cold Gun on an action face with no bursts, and one Cold Gun showing its single generic energy side. I choose to reroll the Cold Gun on the energy face and it lands on the same single generic energy face.
~ (Roll and Reroll Step) If I want to use Renet Tilley, I must do so now before I begin my Main Step. I choose to spin my Cold Gun on the action face to an energy face with the Bolt and Fist energy. I could have used her ability to spin it to an action face with bursts or even the single energy face, but I want the Bolt/Fist energy this turn instead.
~ (Main Step) I now begin my main step.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have a ruling for this specific card.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

I could see her being a useful rogue level card. There are not many action cards that benefit from a burst ability in the unlimited meta, but Cold Gun is definitely the biggest one. She can be useful in getting energy from a die that rolled an action face that you didn’t want an action for in that particular turn. In an unlimited setting, she is a good card, but I don’t think she’s that good to make a huge splash in the major meta. There are too many ways to get rid of her – easily. Her defense stats make her an easy target for the Magic Missile/Unstable Canister burn Global (or even the action ability). I think the most useful spot she can find is on a Bolt Ring team variant. She can spin those Kryptonite action faces over to bolt faces to help boost your damage. She does make for an easy DWiz distraction if your opponent is worried about you benefiting too much from her ability which could keep some of your other major pieces safe from the DWiz. But overall, I don’t think she’ll be as useful as some players have thought, and mainly because I think some folks have misread her ability. She doesn’t spin energy faces to action faces, which definitely would have made her over powered.

Renet Tilley: 79th Dimension of Null-Time gets a rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Prime Play Rating

As far as Prime goes, the limited ramp and churn options make Renet Tilley a little more valuable. You don’t have to worry about a whiffed energy roll on an action die, or you could easily spin that Momentum to it’s double burst from its other action face. I think we’ll see her a lot more in Prime than unlimited. There are definitely less threats out there for direct removal in Prime too. A Cold Gun would KO her on any side because of her low defense, so she makes for a great no-burst Cold Gun target. I really like this card for Prime and I think we’ll see a lot of her in this format.

Renet Tilley: 79th Dimension of Null-Time gets a Prime rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Casual Play Rating

I love how easy this card is to understand for a new player. The ability is worded well and there isn’t a lot of room for confusion. This is one of the many awesome cards in the newest TMNT box. That box is truly a comprehensive box of goodness and I will be recommending it to every new player! I’m really happy that the characters in this box are easy for beginners to understand and use, including this Renet Tilley. A new player will benefit from using this character because she’s not one that they would want to attack with, teaching newer players about the benefit of leaving your character active instead of attacking. I definitely recommend this card and the Heroes in a Half Shell box set for every player out there!

Renet Tilley: 79th Dimension of Null-Time gets a casual play rating of five out of five stars.
5 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at the Turtle Van: Basic Action Card from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles box set. This is in celebration of the release of the new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Heroes in a Half-Shell box set that’s due out tomorrow!

w-turtle-van-bac

Ruling – Ability

Turtle Van is a Continuous Basic Action. If a card ability would affect an Action Die, Turtle Van could be chosen for the effect. One such example is Constantine: Antihero.

Continuous is a keyword found on Action cards. When you use the action die, it is placed in the Field Zone and will remain in the Field Zone until the ability is activated or triggered. Activating or triggering the ability is not considered ‘using’ the die. Using the die is when you move it from your Reserve Pool into the Field Zone. It can remain in the Field Zone after your turn.

Turtle Van’s ability says that you can send Turtle Van to your Used Pile and prevent all damage to a target blocking character. This ability targets a single character die when you activate it. You may target one of your character dice or one of your opponent’s character dice. When activated, the target blocking character die will take no damage from the character it’s blocking. It will also be protected from any Globals or abilities that would damage it after the activation of Turtle Van.

There is a specific timing window for when you can activate Turtle Van. You can only activate the ability on a Turtle Van die after blockers have been assigned, during the Actions and Globals portion of the Attack Step. If you’re the active player, you will have priority to use Actions and Globals. If you’re not the active player, you will have to wait until your opponent passes you priority before you can activate Turtle Van. That means your character can still take ability damage before you’re passed priority and able to activate Turtle Van.

When you activate Turtle Van, it will go directly to the Used Pile, as per the card text.

Turtle Van has a special interaction with Overcrush. Overcrush will only work if all of the attacking character die’s blockers have been KO’d or removed by an effect. If the blocker is still present, but the damage to the blocker is prevented by an ability like Turtle Van, Overcrush will not work.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Turtle Van is a Basic Action with no energy type.
~ It does not have an affiliation.
~ It has a max dice of three.
~ This card is a Common and is #58 of 58.

If you purchase the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turltes Box Set, you will have one copy of each card in the entire set, as well as the maximum number of dice for each card.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Using Turtle Van on your turn.

~ I have one Turtle Van die and a level three Gorilla Grodd: Force of Mind die in the Field Zone. My opponent has a Sidekick die in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Gorilla Grodd as an attacker, moving him into the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assigns their Sidekick to block my Grodd, moving it into the Attack Zone in front of my Grodd die.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I activate my Turtle Van, targeting my opponent’s Sidekick die and placing my Turtle Van into the Used Pile. The Sidekick will take no damage for the rest of the turn. I don’t activate/use any other Actions or Globals, and my opponent doesn’t use any Globals.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) My Grodd’s seven damage is assigned to the Sidekick, but the Sidekick will take no damage. The Sidekick assigns its one damage to Grodd, but it’s not enough to KO him.
~ (Clean Up Step) Both character dice are returned to the Field Zone. All effects end and all dice Out of Play are moved to the Used Pile.

Example Two:
Turtle Van interaction with Overcrush, on your opponent’s turn.

~ I have one Turtle Van die and two Sidekick dice in the Field Zone. My opponent has a level three Gorilla Grodd die in the Field Zone. My opponent has one Bolt energy in the Reserve Pool and has Magic Missile: Basic Action Card.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) My opponent assigns Gorilla Grodd as an attacker, moving him into the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) I assign both of my Sidekick dice to block Grodd, moving them into the Attack Zone in front of the Grodd die.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) My opponent has priority on Actions and Globals, so they use their Bolt energy (moving it Out of Play) to activate the Global on Magic Missile and target one of my blocking Sidekick dice. The Sidekick is KO’d and placed in my Prep Area. My opponent passes priority to me and I activate my Turtle Van, targeting my remaining blocking Sidekick and placing my Turtle Van die in the Used Pile.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Grodd’s seven damage is assigned to the Sidekick, but the Sidekick will take no damage. The Sidekick assigns its one damage to Grodd, but it’s not enough to KO him.
~ (Clean Up Step) Both character dice are returned to the Field Zone. All effects end and all dice Out of Play are moved to the Used Pile.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have a ruling for this specific card.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

Overcrush is not a huge deal in the current meta, but as soon as you don’t bring an answer for it, you’ll face off against a rogue Overcrush team. This action isn’t just good for stopping Overcrush, it’s also handy in preventing your opponent’s blocking character from taking damage and getting some crazy effect to go off or even save one of your own blockers from being KO’d. I could see someone adding this to a team if they’re worried about Overcrush and it’s not a terrible card. But since Overcrush isn’t a major meta thing, I can’t give Turtle Van more than a rogue rating. It’s useful for other things besides stopping Overcrush, but there are also tons of other really good BACs out there that someone may want to use instead.

Turtle Van: Basic Action Card gets a rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Prime Play Rating

Turtle Van has been a huge deal in our local Prime meta. Everyone has an Overcrush team of some kind and Turtle Van is a great tech against it. If other meta scenes even slightly resemble ours, then I could see this particular BAC making it onto lots of teams. It’s also great for stopping double damage that a character may be dealing with against Lady Bullseye’s ability. I really like this card and I’d be surprised if it didn’t make at least Prime rogue status, even with the new versions of Polymorph and Magic Missile coming out tomorrow in the new TMNT Box Set.

Turtle Van: Basic Action Card gets a Prime rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Casual Play Rating

I’ve seen this card in lots of casual matches. It’s not a super confusing ability, but the tricks of how to use it against Overcrush are not as apparent to new players. Learning to use the card in that way is something that comes with experience. The one major thing about this card that confuses players is the Continuous part. Even after some explanation, beginners and less experienced players still have a hard time understanding that action dice do not stay in your Reserve Pool – you can’t use action dice on your opponent’s turn. Newer players confuse using an action die with activating an action die’s ability. That’s really the only thing holding Turtle Van back from a five star casual rating. I still recommend this card to our newer players because it’s a great way to learn how to use action dice and how/when to activate Continuous action dice. Don’t discourage new players from Continuous actions just because they can be difficult to understand at first. If you’re a newer player reading this, I encourage you to add at least one Continuous action to your team and play with it. There are lots of great Continuous actions out there, including Turtle Van!

Turtle Van: Basic Action Card gets a casual play rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey from the Marvel Deadpool set.

w-hit-monkey-hes-a-hitman-whos-a-monkey

Ruling – Ability

Hit-Monkey has an ability that can be activated when he’s blocked. When he’s blocked, you may pay a fist energy to assign Hit-Monkey’s combat damage to the defending player as if he wasn’t blocked, but only for that turn.

His combat damage has no effect on the character or characters that block him, because you are using his ability to redirect his combat damage to a different source other than the blockers. Hit-Monkey would not deal damage to his blockers, but they would deal their combat damage to him, possibly KO’ing him.

If you pay the fist to use Hit-Monkey’s ability and an effect would remove his card text, you would no longer be able to assign his damage to your opponent. This is because his card would have been blanked before the Assign Damage portion of the Attack Step. You would only be able to assign damage to the characters blocking Hit-Monkey. You would not get the fist energy spent for his ability back.

It is also important to remember that even though you’re able to assign his combat damage to your opponent, Hit-Monkey is still considered blocked and would gain no benefit from effects that affect unblocked characters.

If the blockers are not able to KO Hit-Monkey, he would return the Field Zone during the Clean Up Step. This is because he was blocked, but not KO’d. It does not matter that he assigned his combat damage somewhere else, only that he was blocked and not KO’d. If he’s KO’d, then he will go to the Prep Area.

Miscellaneous Card Information

~ Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey is a Fist Character.
~ He has no affiliation.
~ He has a max dice of four.
~ This card is an Uncommon and is #58 of 124.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example:
Hit-Monkey blocked and not KO’d.

~ I have one level three Hit-Monkey die in the Field Zone and one fist energy in the Reserve Pool. My opponent has one Sidekick in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Hit-Monkey as an attacker, placing his die in the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assigns their Sidekick to block my Hit-Monkey, placing it in front of his die in the Attack Zone. Since Hit-Monkey has been blocked, I can now activate his ability. I spend the fist energy (placing it Out of Play) to activate Hit-Monkey’s ability. Hit-Monkey will now be able to assign his combat damage to my opponent instead of the Sidekick.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I do not use any Action dice or Globals. I pass priority to my opponent and they choose not to use any Globals.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Hit-Monkey assigns his four damage to my opponent. The Sidekick assigns its one damage to Hit-Monkey. Damage resolves simultaneously after it’s been assigned, so my opponent takes four damage and Hit-Monkey takes one damage. Hit-Monkey has a defense of three, so he is not KO’d by the one damage from the Sidekick. The Sidekick is not dealt any damage, so it’s not KO’d.
~ (Clean Up Step) Hit-Monkey is blocked and not KO’d, so he is placed back in the Field Zone. The Sidekick blocked and was not KO’d, so it’s placed back in the Field Zone. All effects end and all dice that are Out of Play are placed in the Used Pile.

Example:
Hit-Monkey blocked and card text is blanked after his ability has been used.

~ I have one level three Hit-Monkey die in the Field Zone. I also have one fist energy and a Flying Car: Buckle Up! action die in the Reserve Pool. My opponent has one Sidekick in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Hit-Monkey as an attacker, placing his die in the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assigns their Sidekick to block my Hit-Monkey, placing it in front of his die in the Attack Zone. Since Hit-Monkey has been blocked, I can now activate his ability. I spend the fist energy (placing it Out of Play) to activate Hit-Monkey’s ability. Hit-Monkey will now be able to assign his combat damage to my opponent instead of the Sidekick.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I use my Flying Car action to give Hit-Monkey a +3A/+3D, but it removes all of Hit-Monkey’s ability text. I pass priority to my opponent and they choose not to use any Globals.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Hit-Monkey assigns his seven damage to Sidekick that’s blocking him. The Sidekick assigns its one damage to Hit-Monkey. Damage resolves simultaneously after it’s been assigned, so the Sidekick takes seven damage and Hit-Monkey takes one damage. Hit-Monkey has a defense of six, so he is not KO’d by the one damage from the Sidekick. The Sidekick has one defense and is KO’d by Hit-Monkey’s seven attack.
~ (Clean Up Step) Hit-Monkey is blocked and not KO’d, so he is placed back in the Field Zone. The Sidekick is placed in the Prep Area because it was KO’d. All effects end and all dice that are Out of Play are placed in the Used Pile.

Official Sources

You can find an official ruling about the card on WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF), here.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

As much as I like this card, I think he’s too difficult to work with in an Unlimited format where there are better cards. His ability is good and I think that the right pilot with the right team build might be able to make him work. It takes special care and specific building to make something like this viable though, so I don’t think he’s a card that will see a lot of Unlimited play in the current meta. He’s still a good card, just not the best choice for this particular format. I don’t think he’s fast enough for the current speed of the meta.

Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey gets a rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Prime Play Rating

I don’t think this card is getting the recognition it deserves for the Prime format. I think this card may see more play, and even a few top positions in some upcoming PDC events. If it doesn’t, I would be very disappointed, but not surprised since he doesn’t get much love anyway. I could be totally wrong about this card, but it seems like such a good card with the current list of available cards. There are still plenty of build options for using a card like this and not a whole lot of ways around it. I suspect Captain Cold’s Cold Gun: Frozen “Firearm” is going to make every team list, but there are ways to play around those. Hit-Monkey may not be everyone’s style, but I think he has great potential and folks would be remiss to not give this card a shot on a team.

Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey. gets a Prime rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Casual Play Rating

It’s not often that a card receives a five star rating from me, especially for a beginning or casual player. I don’t think a card ability can be written any more clear than how this one is written. It even has reminder text that helps remind the player that the combat damage is not dealt to the blocking character(s). The confusion around this card begins when you get into more advanced level of play, like the examples in the WORF ruling. But for beginners and casual players that don’t see a lot of the competitive type cards, this is probably one of the best cards to start someone off with. This character’s ability is great to play on its own or with some combo cards, which is one of the reasons it’s such a good card for beginners. I can easily recommend this card for a player of any skill level.

Hit-Monkey: He’s A Hitman. Who’s a Monkey gets a casual play rating of five out of five stars.
5 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

For this week’s confusing card of the week article, we’re going to take a look at Negasonic Teenage Warhead: Bored in School from the Marvel Deadpool set.

I’m also adding a new Prime Rating to each of my Confusing Card of the Week articles. They will follow the same rating system as the Unlimited Competitive Rating, since Prime is also a competitive format. You can find a breakdown of how I choose my ratings on my sticky article, Helpful Sites and About this Blog.

wm-negasonic-teenage-warhead-bored-in-school

Ruling – Ability

Negasonic Teenage Warhead has the Underdog keyword. Most of the Underdog abilities do different things or have different effects depending on the character. The one thing that all Underdog abilities have in common is that they require you to have less characters in the Field Zone than your opponent. If you have the same number of characters in the Field Zone as your opponent, you do not meet the Underdog requirements. Characters that have a when fielded Underdog ability will count themselves because they see themselves in Field Zone when they are fielded.

Negasonic Teenage Warhead’s Underdog ability says that when she attacks, you spin her up to level three and she gains the Fast keyword. She does not spin back down after your attack is complete. She will lose her Fast keyword at the end of turn since it was an effect of a when attacks ability and all effects end at the end of turn.

Fast allows that character to deal their combat damage before other characters.

Miscellaneous Card Information

Negasonic Teenage Warhead: Bored in School is a Bolt Character and has the X-Men affiliation. This card also has a Max Dice of four.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Meeting Negasonic Teenage Warhead’s Underdog requirements.

~ I have one Negasonic Teenage Warhead die and my opponent has two Sidekick dice in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Negasonic Teenage Warhead die to attack. Her Underdog ability checks and sees that there are more characters in my opponent’s field. Negasonic Teenage Warhead’s die will spin up to level three and she gains the Fast keyword.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assign a Sidekick to block.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Negasonic Teenage Warhead deals six damage to the Sidekick and it’s immediately KO’d because of her Fast ability. The Sidekick will not assign any damage to Negasonic Teenage Warhead.
~ (Clean Up Step) Negasonic Teenage Warhead returns to the Field Zone because she was blocked and not KO’d. She loses her Fast keyword because all effects clear at this time.

Example Two:
Not meeting Negasonic Teenage Warhead’s Underdog requirements.

~ I have one level two Negasonic Teenage Warhead die in the Field Zone. My opponent doesn’t have any characters.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign my Negasonic Teenage Warhead die to attack. Her Underdog ability checks and sees that I have more characters in the field than my opponent does. She does not gain any benefits of her Underdog ability.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent does not have any characters to block with.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Negasonic Teenage Warhead is unblocked and deals her attack value of three to my opponent’s life total. Her die will go Out of Play until the Clean Up Step.
~ (Clean Up Step) My Negasonic Teenage Warhead, along with any other dice that are Out of Play, will go into the Used Pile.


Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF), does not have an official ruling for this specific card.

You can also find an additional ruling about Underdog, here.

Turn Order Summary Reference

turn-order

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

I think this is a very unique card for a format like unlimited. With the right team build, I think this card could possibly sneak in a top somewhere, but I don’t think she’s quite on the rogue level yet. You would probably need a specific team build that was more focused around this card as a win condition for her to be of great value. She’s got a good ability, her purchase cost is great, and her fielding costs are really good. Her only downside is her defense and that she requires Underdog to trigger her ability. In a format dominated by Bard variants, not having blockers is a bad idea unless you’re running a team that can race Bard to the final blow. This character is worth looking at and playing around with because someone could find a way to make her work.

Negasonic Teenage Warhead: Bored in School gets a rating of two out of five stars.
2 Stars

Prime Play Rating

I believe this card is great for Prime. The biggest challenge will be the Underdog part because without Fabricate or Blue-Eyes, you’re limited on abilities that can KO your own characters. All of her pros that I listed in her unlimited rating also apply here. Her purchase cost is cheap, her fielding costs are great, and her ability isn’t too shabby. She’s not a card to be overlooked in the Prime format.

Negasonic Teenage Warhead: Bored in School gets a Prime rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

Casual Play Rating

Negasonic Teenage Warhead’s ability is not too confusing for new players, once it’s been explained thoroughly. I could recommend her for a player of any skill level to try out in any casual setting. She’s a great teaching tool for field management and abilities, like Fabricate. Underdog abilities can help players feel more comfortable with KO’ing their own characters for the sake of the ability. I also feel like this Underdog ability is probably the most useful one in the game. This character can easily work as an add-on to a team or on a team built around her. This makes her exceptionally good for casual play.

Negasonic Teenage Warhead: Bored in School gets a casual play rating of four out of five stars.
4 Stars

Opinions on this card? Leave a comment!
Is there a card your confused on?
Is there a combo that seems too good to be true?
Leave me a comment here or message me on Facebook at Dice Dice Kitty and thanks for reading!

Special thanks to The Reserve Pool for the use of their site.

Roll on, Dice Masters!

Greetings Fellow Dice Fans!

 

During the month of December, I’m featuring a different cold/ice/snow related card each week to celebrate the winter holidays. Today, we’re going to take a look at Captain Cold: Rogue Leader from the DC Green Arrow and The Flash set.

I’m also adding a new Prime Rating to each of my Confusing Card of the Week articles. They will follow the same rating system as the Unlimited Competitive Rating, since Prime is also a competitive format. You can find a breakdown of how I choose my ratings on my sticky article, Helpful Sites and About this Blog.

captain-cold-rogue-leader

Ruling – Ability

Captain Cold has a While Active ability. While Active abilities will work regardless of how many of that character’s dice are active in the Field Zone. Think of this ability like a light – it’s either on or it’s off.

while-active-light

Captain Cold’s ability involves the use of Action Dice. Action Dice are any dice that do not have attack and defense stats on them. There are Basic Action Dice that all have a Pow! symbol on them and then there are Non-Basic Action Dice that have symbols related to what the card is. Captain Cold’s ability will trigger when you use any type of Action Die, as long as he’s active. The image below shows the difference between Basic and Non-Basic Action Dice. There are many more Non-Basic Action Dice, but all Basic Action Dice have the same image in different colors.

action-dice-examples

While Captain Cold is active, when you use an Action Die, a target opposing Sidekick will lose the chance to attack or block for that turn. His ability is not optional and if your opponent has a legal target for Captain Cold’s ability, you must target that character.

Any die that is considered a Sidekick is a potential target for Captain Cold’s ability. Ally Characters count as Sidekicks while they’re active in the Field Zone, meaning they can be targeted by Captain Cold’s ability.

Action Dice normally can only be ‘used’ on your turn. When you use an action die, the die is moved from your Reserve Pool and either placed Out of Play or into the Field Zone depending on the type of Action Die you’re using. There are special abilities that allow you to use an Action Die on your opponent’s turn. One such example of this is Mr. Mxyzptlk: 5th Dimension. His ability says:

“While Mr. Mxyzptlk is active, when an opponent uses a Basic Action Die, you may use a copy of that Basic Action Die.”

When you use a copy of a Basic Action Die with Mr. Mxyzptlk’s ability, it satisfies the requirements for Captain Cold’s ability allowing you to target an opposing Sidekick and prevent it from attacking or blocking. This is one way you can benefit from Captain Cold’s ability on your opponent’s turn to stop a Sidekick from attacking you.

As a side note, Mr. Mxyzptlk: 5th Dimension only allows you to use a copy of a Basic Action Die and not a Non-Basic Action Die that your opponent uses. You need to pay very close attention to wording when playing characters like Mr. Mxyzptlk and Captain Cold.

You won’t benefit from using Captain Cold’s ability during the Attack Step because characters are already assigned to attack and block before you’re able to use Action Dice. You can still target the Sidekick, but the ability won’t have any effect on a character that’s already declared as a blocker.

Miscellaneous Card Information

Captain Cold: Rogue Leader is a Bolt Character and has the Villain affiliation. This card also has a Max Dice of four.

Examples

These examples are for information purposes only, to show what would happen in certain scenarios. I am not suggesting that these examples are the best outcomes for each scenario and each example only features relevant parts of the turn, not the entire turn.

Example One:
Using Captain Cold’s ability during your Main Step
.

~ I have two Captain Cold dice active. I have a Kryptonite: Green Death die showing an action face in my Reserve Pool. My opponent has an Oracle: Master Investigator and an Alfred Pennyworth: MI-5 active in the Field Zone.
~ (Main Step) I use my Kryptonite (sending it Out of Play) and target Oracle.
~ (Main Step) I use Captain Cold’s ability to target Alfred, making Alfred unable to block.

Example Two:
Using Captain Cold’s ability during the Attack Step
.

~ I have two Captain Cold dice active. I have a Kryptonite: Green Death die showing an action face in my Reserve Pool. My opponent has an Oracle: Master Investigator and an Alfred Pennyworth: MI-5 active in the Field Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Attackers) I assign one of my Captain Cold dice (3A/3D) as an attacker, moving it into the Attack Zone.
~ (Attack Step – Assign Blockers) My opponent assigns Alfred (1A/1D) as a blocker and places him in the Attack Zone in front of my Captain Cold.
~ (Attack Step – Actions and Globals) I use my Kryptonite and target Alfred. I target Alfred with Captain Cold’s ability, but he’s already blocking and can’t be removed as a blocker with Captain Cold’s ability. I don’t use any other Actions or Globals.
~ (Attack Step – Assign and Resolve Damage) Captain Cold assigns his three attack to Alfred and Alfred assigns his one attack to Captain Cold. Alfred is KO’d but since I used Kryptonite on his die, he doesn’t get his ability and will go to the Prep Area.

Example Three:
Using Captain Cold’s ability during your opponent’s Main Step.

~ I have a Mr. Mxyzptlk: 5th Dimension and a Captain Cold active. My opponent has a Sidekick in the Field Zone.
~ (Main Step) My opponent has a Power Bolt Action Die and uses it to deal two damage to me.
~ (Main Step) Mr. Mxyzptlk allows me to use a copy of Power Bolt and I choose to do so, dealing two damage to my opponent. Captain Cold’s ability triggers and I target the Sidekick my opponent has active in the Field Zone, making it unable to attack this turn.

Official Sources

WizKids Official Rules Forum (WORF) does not have an official ruling for this specific card.

You can find a ruling that relates to the interaction between Captain Cold and Mr. Mxyzptlk, here.

You can find a ruling that explains the interaction of abilities like Kryptonite’s on characters already declared as blockers, here.

Unlimited Competitive Play Rating

Captain Cold just doesn’t have what it takes to see major meta play. His ability, with the required use of an Action Die and being limited to only Sidekicks as targets, is definitely not suited for Unlimited. His TFC of six is expensive for what he does and his stats are not worth using this character over another with a more useful ability. There are other ways to accomplish what his ability does, but on a larger scale and more effective as well – Cloudkill. I don’t see this card making it out of any binder or box for a competitive event like WKO.

Captain Cold: Rogue Leader gets a Unlimited rating of zero out of five stars.
0 Stars

PDC Prime Play Rating

I have limited experience with Prime at the moment, so I could very possibly being missing something or have overlooked something. I don’t think Sidekicks – even Allies – will be a huge problem in Prime. If Captain Cold targeted any character, and not just a Sidekick, then he would be much better. Even then, he still wouldn’t hit the rogue team list for me because of his Action Die requirement. I bumped his rating up to a one star instead of zero stars for Prime because there are still many unknowns about the Prime format, but I still can’t recommend this card for Prime play. His TFC for the stats are not impressive and his ability just doesn’t cut it.

Captain Cold: Rogue Leader gets a Prime rating of one out of five stars.
1 Star

Casual Play Rating

While I don’t think this card is particularly useful, it’s not overly complicated. I think if you paired Captain Cold with the right cards, he might be mildly useful. I could see him with Foot Ninja: Ninja Syndicate and White Tiger: Mystical Amulet. You could use White Tiger’s Global to make them add a Sidekick to the Field, which increases Foot Ninja’s attack and defense, then use an Action Die and make that Sidekick unable to block. That’s a lot of things going on, but most casual teams that I play and see played locally have many facets to them. But my casual ratings are based on the complexity of the card and how difficult the card is for a new player to use, and not only how good the card is. Captain Cold has complex uses with cards like Mr. Mxyzptlk, which may not be immediately noticed or even understood by a beginner. That combo is a great way to teach those particular uses to a player and help them to better understand card wording.

Captain Cold: Rogue Leader gets a casual play rating of three out of five stars.
3 Stars

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